snake charmer

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snake charmer

an entertainer, esp in Asia, who charms or appears to charm snakes by playing music and by rhythmic body movements
References in periodicals archive ?
"Perturbed by the snakes, on August 12, Jailor Satish Chandra Tripathi called more than 12 snake charmers who captured four snakes with the help of their flute music after three hours," read the release.
The film showcases snake charmer Sattar Jogi, the Murli Been player, who explains that the music instrument could hardly ever be found.
The Congress party's general secretary was seen speaking to snake charmers in her party's stronghold in Raebareli.
(1) Entitled The Snake Charmer, this striking work, which dates from around 1879-1880, has become almost synonymous with Said's revered inquiry into "the way cultural dominance ...
In a shocking incident, a snake charmer fainted after he was attacked by a python that was wrapped around his neck for a live show in the central Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.
Last month, a pair of cobras was caught from the record room by a team of four snake charmers after strenuous efforts.
It is especially vibrant at night attracting snake charmers, acrobats, musicians, monkey trainers, herb sellers, dancers and even dentists.
Born and brought up in a traditional family of Snake Charmers, a nomadic tribe, Gulabo popularly known as Gulabo Sapera has taken the traditional folk dance "Kalbelia" to new heights and her name is now synonymous with the "Kalbelia".
A SCOT on a photography expedition to India thought he was going to die after being kidnapped by snake charmers. y t r Ross McLean was held captive for three weeks by a community of outcasts who were armed and openly smoked opium.
Each year, an estimated one million pilgrims visit Varanasi, where snake charmers are still found on its chaotic streets.
Meanwhile dozens of snake charmers who specialize in netting snakes and like have arrived here in Naseerabad and Jafferabad to net these venomous adversaries.
By the 1970s, ghost trains and fun houses had replaced the freak shows and snake charmers.