snakebite

(redirected from Snake-bite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

snakebite,

wound inflicted by the teeth of a snake. The bite of a nonvenomous snake is rarely serious. Venomous snakes have fangs, hollow teeth through which poison is injected into a victim. All types of snake venom contain a toxin that affects the nerves and tends to paralyze the victim. In addition, the venom of the coral snake, the cobra, and the South American rattlesnake contains constituents that damage blood cells and dissolve the linings of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels, causing severe or fatal internal hemorrhage and collapse. First aid for venomous snakebites consists of retarding the spread of the poison through the circulatory system by applying a constricting band or an ice pack, or by spraying ethyl chloride on the wound. It is essential that the patient avoid exertion and the taking of stimulants, as both increase the pulse rate. The constricting band should be applied above the swelling caused by the wound; it should be tight, but not tight enough to stop the pulsing of the blood. If only a few minutes have passed since the infliction of the bite, it is possible to remove much of the poison by suction (see first aidfirst aid,
immediate and temporary treatment of a victim of sudden illness or injury while awaiting the arrival of medical aid. Proper early measures may be instrumental in saving life and ensuring a better and more rapid recovery.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Antivenins, which counteract the toxins, are available for most types of snake venom. The two main groups of poisonous snakes in the United States are the coral snakes, which rarely attack humans unless provoked, and the pit vipers (copperhead, cottonmouth moccasin, the various rattlers), which require no provocation.

snakebite

1. a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. a drink of cider and lager
References in periodicals archive ?
Farming is the main occupation in the study area where they barefoot while ploughing their fields, which makes them prone to snake-bites. The dwellings, fields and forests and the resting places of snake include tall grass or brush, rocky areas, fallen logs, bluffs, swamps, marshes, and deep holes in the ground are predispose to frequent contact of humans and snakes.
Snake-bite incidences vary from region to region and depend upon (i) the natural habitat of particular species of snake in the region; and (ii) probability of human being coming in contact.
In view of the monetary benefits given by the Government of Andhra Pradesh, India, under the scheme Apathbandhu to the dependants of those who die due to snake-bite, several false cases of snake-bite have also been reported for claiming the compensation (9).
We report retrospective epidemiological data of snake-bite incidence in Andhra Pradesh; and prospective assessment of the snake venom antigens in forensic specimens collected from snake-bite victims through immunoanalytical approach.
The data of snake-bite cases from January 1999 to December 2003 were obtained from the records of the Andhra Pradesh Forensic Science Laboratory (APFSL), Hyderabad.
Data collection: The case data documentation of snake-bite cases recorded during the period 1999 to 2003 were obtained from the Andhra Pradesh Forensic Science Laboratory to collect the information on age, sex, seasonal and district distribution, time of incident, death of a victim and the time point of analysis.
Sample collection and preservation: Forensic specimens (skin/skin scrapings, blood/serum) were collected from 22 human snake-bite victims (diagnosed, based on the clinical symptoms and fang marks), who were admitted to the Forensic Medicine Department, Osmania General Hospital, Afzalgunj, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, during 2004 (June-September, rainy season), after obtaining institutional ethical clearance.
Chippaux."Snake-bites: appraisal of the global situation".
Head of the project, Dr Ziaullah Mughul, admitting shortcomings and shortage of funds, told on Sunday that every year around 40,000 incidents of snake-bite occur in which over 30,000 die in Pakistan due to snake-bite.
Around 90 percent snake-bite deaths could have been prevented if anti-venom vaccine was produced at local level, said Dr Ziaullah.
The snake-bite victim needs four doses for complete treatment, he added.