Channidae

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Channidae

[′kan·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The snakeheads, a family of fresh-water perciform fishes in the suborder Anabantoidei.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mather, "A reappraisal of the evolution of Asian snakehead fishes (Pisces, Channidae) using molecular data from multiple genes and fossil calibration," Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, vol.
Villagers frequently use warin not only for catching fish for their own consumption and for sale, but also for catching food for the giant snakehead fish, a voracious carnivore.
But who breeds and sells nutria and snakehead fish? Who keeps them as pets?
The Northern snakehead fish is a little different from the 388 animal species currently listed as endangered: Federal guidelines say the invasive Asian species is a major threat to native wildlife, and the Virginia state government asks anglers who find one to "kill it humanely with a blow to the head." Nicknamed the Frankenfish, the snakehead is capable of breathing air, slithering over land, and surviving three days outside the water, magnifying its ability to move from one habitat to another.
Travelers' tales The timing of ancient migrations of snakehead fish from the Indian subcontinent into Europe, Asia, and Africa reflects temperature and humidity changes in those locations (165: 341).
At first, Washington, D.C., anglers had only the northern snakehead fish to fear.
Take snakehead fish, the creatures that drew plenty of local media attention over the last year.
Trace their roots and write an essay comparing them to more notorious invasive species, like the northern snakehead fish. How are their circumstances similar?
AMBULANCE DRIVER TO DOCTOR: This man was just bitten viciously by a snakehead fish that crawled into a Wal-Mart!
The latest findings include some glorious orchids; a monkey with a funny snub-nose that causes it to sneeze every time it rains; a primitive snakehead fish that can walk and even live on land for up to four days; a unicorn-ed millipede; a frog with blue jewel-like eyes; another frog with ahorns' poking out of its eyebrows; a huge fanged aDracula' fish; wild bananas; and even a pit-viper whose body patterns resemble intricate jewellery!
Infections (prevalence 8.3%) in snakehead fish (Channa spp.) also represent a food safety risk, because snakehead fish are cultured in Vietnam and are sometimes eaten raw or inadequately cooked.
On the other hand, Pb and Cd residues in snakehead fish (Channa striata) were less than0.05-2.13 and less than0.02-0.24 mg kg-1 wet weight, while the concentrations of Zn in these fish were 3.37-12.19 mg kg-1.