Snopes


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Snopes

family of unscrupulous climbers, horse thieves, lechers, and murderers in Faulkner novels. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 940]
References in periodicals archive ?
A false report published online claims Sasha Obama, daughter of former President Barack Obama, was arrested for shoplifting, according to Snopes.com.
Fact-checking site Snopes says the challenge first appeared in mid-2018 linked to suicide reports without actual evidence.
The social network had paid the Associated Press and Snopes to combat its misinformation crisis.
Summary: California [USA], February 2 (ANI): Fact-checking organisation Snopes is parting ways with Facebook to scrutinise the content posted on the social network for truthfulness.
But Trump is far outpacing Obama in terms of travel costs to taxpayers, and it's "a near certainty" that this will continue, according to (https://www.snopes.com/obama-trump-travel-costs/) Snopes.
It also said it would work with organisations, such as fact-checking website Snopes and ABC News, to check the authenticity of stories.
IN SPITE OF ITS NOTICEABLE ABSENCE OF MAJOR BLACK CHARACTERS, William Faulkner's Snopes trilogy offers fertile ground for expanding critical conversations on the racial concerns that Faulkner interrogated throughout his career.
Par ailleurs, une cooperation sera mise en place avec certains organismes de presse, comme ABC News, l'agence Associated Press ou le site Snopes, specialise dans la verification des faits, pour veiller a l'authenticite des informations vehiculees sur la plate-forme d'echanges de contenus.
The rumor-debunking website Snopes.com rates the claim in this story that Miller circulated in September as "mostly false." While a Texas man did claim that his apartment complex made him take down his American flag because it presented a "threat to Muslims," no one else substantiated that reasoning.
The venerable snopes.com (snopes.com), which has been investigating and debunking internet rumors and urban legends since 1995, now has a Fact Check feature (snopes.com/category/snopes/ facts/) that incorporates some political content.
The image appeared across social media and on reputable news sites, (Snopes' debunking mentioned USA Daily Politics and Jews News, to name a few) but the news was, of course, completely false.
Snopes, the website dedicted to knocking down faked news, tracked down the origin of the photo.