snout

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snout

1. the part of the head of a vertebrate, esp a mammal, consisting of the nose, jaws, and surrounding region, esp when elongated
2. the corresponding part of the head of such insects as weevils
3. a brownish noctuid moth, Hypena proboscidalis, that frequents nettles: named from the palps that project prominently from the head at rest

snout

[snau̇t]
(geography)
A promontory or protruding mass of rock.
(hydrology)
The protruding lower extremity of a glacier.
(vertebrate zoology)
The elongated nose of various mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its snout and mouth shrank and its lips became more muscular.
FISH FINGERS J Andre calms the fearsome great white by gently stroking its super-sensitive snout
ALL police forces have what is known as a 'snout' fund - a fund from which informants are paid.
When a sawfish is hungry, it waves its sharp-toothed snout through a school of fish.
A device used to cut a hog's snout to control its rooting.
RUDY the pig was born in 1997 in Iowa, USA, with two snouts and a third eye.
As far as Neighbourhood Renewal is concerned the government want to replace a system which involves the local community being involved at a local level with a 'snouts in the trough' approach that has been shown to fail over many years.
Health officers seized more than 20 frozen chicken, four boxes of turkey feet, five bags of cow's snouts and cow's feet, all unsafe for human consumption.
The most notable characteristic of the paddlefish is the pronounced snout that contains an intricate sensory system.
The enormous dinosaurs' snouts, laden with nerve endings, may have been used to nuzzle mates in a dinosaur make out session before sex, (http://www.nature.com/articles/srep44942) according to a study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports.
By tweaking the DNA of chickens in the early stages of their evelopment, scientists were able to rewind evolutionary progress and give the creatures snouts, which are thought to have been lost in the cretaceous period millions of years ago.
After a lean period, Scotland's pork industry has saved its bacon by making an export agreement with the Chinese, who are buying pigs' snouts, trotters and ears.