Snyders, Frans

Snyders, Frans

(fräns snī`dərs), 1579–1657, most celebrated Flemish still-life and animal painter, b. Antwerp. He studied with Bruegel, the younger, and Hendrik van Balen but was principally influenced by Rubens. Snyders often collaborated with Rubens and Jordaens, sometimes painting the animals in their pictures, while they in turn did figures for some of his paintings of the hunt. The early work of Snyders was largely still life, but he is best known for his spirited animal compositions, primarily hunting scenes and struggles between wild animals. He painted many works for Philip IV of Spain, a number of which are in the Prado. His paintings are fresh and luminous in color and strong in composition. His best-known works include Stag Hunt (The Hague); Hippopotamus Hunt (Rijksmus.); Lioness Attacking a Boar; Dogs in the Kitchen (Louvre); Lions Chasing a Deer (Metropolitan Mus.); and Boar Hunt (Mus. of Fine Arts, Boston).

Snyders, Frans

 

(also Snijders). Baptized Nov. 11, 1579, in Antwerp; died there Aug. 19, 1657. Flemish painter.

Snyders studied under P. Brueghel the Younger and H. van Balen. He worked on several paintings together with P. P. Rubens. From 1602 (?) to 1609 he lived in Italy. Snyders was the greatest Flemish master of still life and animal portrayal; the human figures in his paintings were done by J. Jordaens, A. Janssens, and other artists. Snyders’ monumental works, for example, Still Life with a Swan (17th century; A. S. Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow), are distinguished for their sweeping composition and skillfull rendering of texture, as well as for the vigorous force of their imagery.

REFERENCES

Levinson-Lessing, V. F. Sneiders i flamandskii natiurmort. Leningrad, 1926.
Robeis, H. “Frans Snyders’ Entwicklung als Stillebenmaler.” Wallraf-Richartz-Jahrbuch, 1969, vol. 31, pp. 43-94. [23–1890–]