football hooliganism

(redirected from Soccer riot)

football hooliganism

the violent crowd disorder, and associated football-related disturbances away from football grounds, which first attracted major public and media attention in the 1960s. After initial attempts to explain football violence in terms of the psychological characteristics of the ‘hooligans’ (Harrington, 1968), more recently a variety of sociological explanations have been suggested:
  1. opposition to the commercialization of football and the growing distance between players and the owners of clubs on the one hand, and ordinary working-class supporters on the other (Taylor, 1971);
  2. rather than ‘true’ violence, behaviour which appears disordered and threatening in fact often has its own ‘rules of disorder’: is ritualized (Marsh et al., 1978);
  3. deriving from LABELLING THEORY and DEVIANCE AMPLIFICATION (see Cohen, 1973), ‘hooliganism’ is seen as a media-amplified MORAL PANIC;
  4. since football violence has a long history increased modern attention to it is a reflection of a ‘civilizing’ tendency in society which has resulted in a lower societal tolerance of violence of the kind long associated with working-class conceptions of masculinity but now socially unacceptable (Dunning et al., 1988) (see also CIVILIZING PROCESS.

Arguably, each of these explanations has some justification.

References in periodicals archive ?
Two Leeds United fans in Istanbul for their team's match against Galatasaray were stabbed to death in 2000 during a soccer riot on Taksim.
Kirkpatrick, "Egyptian Soccer Riot Kills More Than 70," New York Times, 1 February 2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/02/world/middleeast/scoreskilled-in-egyptian -soccermayhem.html?_r=0.
Kerry's departure from Cairo was briefly delayed, news agencies said, because hundreds of supporters of the soccer club Al Ahly, known as ultras, blocked the road to the airport in a protest related to a court case about a soccer riot in Port Said last year.
Egyptian protesters torched buildings and tried to disrupt commerce on the Suez Canal Saturday, after a Cairo court reaffirmed the death sentences of 21 people convicted of instigating a deadly soccer riot last year.
Violent protests have erupted in the Suez Canal city since January over the detention of dozens of people after a soccer riot in the city last year in which 70 people were killed.
On Saturday, at least 31 were killed and over 300 injured in clashes between police and angry mob in Port Said, after a court ruled the execution of 21 convicts in a local soccer riot that killed 74 early last year.
The violence broke out after a court sentenced 21 defendants to death for their roles in a mass soccer riot a year ago.
"It was the worst soccer riot in Egyptian history and among the worst in the world," David Kirkpatrick wrote in the New York Times.
When 79 people died during an Egyptian soccer riot in early February, the world was once again reminded how much higher the stakes are off the field than on it.
Police fired salvos of tear gas and birdshot at rock-throwing protesters as popular anger over a deadly soccer riot spilled over into a second day of street violence that left three people dead and more than 1,500 injured, doctors and health officials said
AN ENGLISH Defence League thug jailed for his part in a soccer riot could still be allowed to take up a place at a Midland university.
The Boston Globe writer said "internet fan sites are still agonising over a 21-year-old soccer riot that killed 96 people."