football hooliganism

(redirected from Soccer violence)

football hooliganism

the violent crowd disorder, and associated football-related disturbances away from football grounds, which first attracted major public and media attention in the 1960s. After initial attempts to explain football violence in terms of the psychological characteristics of the ‘hooligans’ (Harrington, 1968), more recently a variety of sociological explanations have been suggested:
  1. opposition to the commercialization of football and the growing distance between players and the owners of clubs on the one hand, and ordinary working-class supporters on the other (Taylor, 1971);
  2. rather than ‘true’ violence, behaviour which appears disordered and threatening in fact often has its own ‘rules of disorder’: is ritualized (Marsh et al., 1978);
  3. deriving from LABELLING THEORY and DEVIANCE AMPLIFICATION (see Cohen, 1973), ‘hooliganism’ is seen as a media-amplified MORAL PANIC;
  4. since football violence has a long history increased modern attention to it is a reflection of a ‘civilizing’ tendency in society which has resulted in a lower societal tolerance of violence of the kind long associated with working-class conceptions of masculinity but now socially unacceptable (Dunning et al., 1988) (see also CIVILIZING PROCESS.

Arguably, each of these explanations has some justification.

References in periodicals archive ?
ONE of the most sickening incidents of recent soccer violence surfaced in October, 2017.
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The minister was speaking a day after protesters rampaged through Cairo, furious over the acquittal of seven of nine police officers in a trial over soccer violence that left 74 people dead in 2012.
A police official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to discuss the case, said the transfer was necessary to ensure calm before a March 9 court hearing that is expected to confirm the death sentences and issue new verdicts for police officers also charged in connection with the soccer violence. Protesters set a police vehicle on fire, and pelted the main police station with rocks.
The unrest, the latest in a series of violent incidents in Port Saeed, was sparked by police's relocation of 39 prisoners to a jail outside the city ahead of a court verdict due on March 9 on deadly soccer violence that occurred more than a year ago.
Violence erupted in Port Said after a judge sentenced 21 people to death in connection with soccer violence that left 74 fans of the Cairo-based Al-Ahly team dead.
An Egyptian court has handed down death sentences for 21 people accused of taking part in soccer violence last year that killed 74.
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The strict penalties are part of a new sports law which the Greek government passed in February aiming to clamp down on soccer violence.