social behavior


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social behavior

[′sō·shəl bi′hā·vyər]
(zoology)
Any behavior on the part of an organism stimulated by, or acting upon, another member of the same species.
References in periodicals archive ?
During correct demonstrations, the researcher displayed all of the steps of the targeted social behavior. During incorrect demonstrations, the researcher either omitted one of the steps or demonstrated one of the steps incorrectly.
Second, it may be difficult for professionals and parents to determine what procedures to implement when teaching social behaviors to individuals diagnosed with ASD.
School social behavior is described as an international conduct in which in individual behaves by keeping in view the audience in a given setting.
The academic success of the deaf and hard of hearing students is directly influenced the school social behavior (Horner 1999).
Queller of Rice University in Houston holds that group selection exerts a lesser influence on social behavior and evolution of microorganisms than kin selection does.
Genes that foster social behavior play key roles in keeping cheating cells under control, report Queller and his coworkers in the Oct.
In addition, verbal and physical cueing can often prompt the student to the more appropriate social behavior.
Cognitive strategies are often introduced to treatment as the child becomes more able to use cognitive and memory skills needed to self-monitor and self-modify social behavior. Indeed, self-monitoring alone has been shown to produce reactive effects leading to behavioral change (Kanfer and Gaelick-Buys, 1991).
When it comes to social behavior, Smuts says that, so far, capuchins seem to be showing the greatest creativity among nonhuman primates.
In the April 2003 Current Anthropology, Perry, Manson, and their colleagues published their analysis of the monkeys' social behaviors. It's based on data collected over 13 years.
"Beyond descriptions of basic female-male relationships, more than 30 years of captive studies offer fragmented, often distorted, interpretations of squirrel monkey social behavior," asserts Boinski.
New findings now support a controversial version of that model stating that different social behaviors in groups of a social species, such as ants, living close together may also give rise to new species.

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