discrimination

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discrimination

Electronics the selection of a signal having a particular frequency, amplitude, phase, etc., effected by the elimination of other signals by means of a discriminator

discrimination

the process by which a member, or members, of a socially defined group is, or are, treated differently (especially unfairly) because of his/her/their membership of that group. To be selected for less favourable treatment, a social group may be constructed by reference to such features as race, ethnicity, gender or religion. A distinction can be drawn between ‘categorical’ and 'S tatistical’ discrimination. Categorical discrimination is the unfavourable treatment of all persons socially assigned to a particular social category because the discriminator believes that this discrimination is required by his social group. Statistical discrimination refers to less favourable treatment of individuals based on the belief that there is a probability that their membership of a social group leads to them possessing less desirable characteristics.

In the UK, there are laws that deal with both sex and race discrimination: the Sex Discrimination Act (1975) and the Race Relations Act (1976). In both Acts, ‘direct’ discrimination is made illegal, in that a person may not be treated less favourably than another on the grounds of gender, colour, ethnicity or race. However, the Race Relations Act also attempts to tackle ‘indirect’ discrimination. This was defined as consisting of treatment which may be described as equal in a formal sense, as between different racial groups, but discriminatory in its effect upon a particular racial group. Indirect discrimination is the application of conditions or requirements which may mean that:' (1) the proportion of persons of a racial group who can comply with these is considerably smaller than the proportion of persons not of that racial group who can comply with them; (2) they are to the detriment of the persons who cannot comply with them; (3) they are not justifiable irrespective of the colour, race, nationality or ethnic or national origins of the person to whom they are applied’ (A Guide to the Race Relations Act 1976 Home Office, 1977). See also POSITIVE DISCRIMINATION, RACE RELATIONS, SEGREGATION, GHETTO, PREJUDICE, SEX DISCRIMINATION.

Discrimination

 

(1) The limitation or deprivation of the rights of certain categories of citizens on the basis of such criteria as race, national origin, and sex. In bourgeois countries racial discrimination is especially widespread—the limitation of rights and persecution of persons for reasons of their racial origin. It is openly practiced in the USA against Indians, Negroes, and Chinese. In the Republic of South Africa the discrimination against East Indians and other non-Boer and non-European populations practiced by the English and Afrikaaners (Boers) has reached large proportions. Widely practiced in capitalist states are such forms of discrimination as lower pay for the labor of women and young people and the limitation of rights on the basis of political and religious convictions.

(2) Discrimination in international relations is the establishment of lesser rights for the representatives, organizations, or citizens of one country than for those of another. The practice of discrimination usually brings about reciprocal measures in the form of retortion on the part of the government against whom it is directed. The USSR and other socialist countries vigorously oppose all forms of discrimination in international relations.

discrimination

[di‚skrim·ə′nā·shən]
(communications)
In frequency-modulated systems, the detection or demodulation of the imposed variations in the frequency of the carriers.
In a tuned circuit, the degree of rejection of unwanted signals.
Of any system or transducer, the difference between the losses at specified frequencies with the system or transducer terminated in specified impedances.
(computer science)

discrimination

discriminationclick for a larger image
The minimum angular distance at which two objects on a radar screen can be seen separately. In the figure, the discrimination capability of the radar is 2°.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is particularly noteworthy that this book sheds lights on new generations of Zainichi Koreans who no longer remain a severely deprived minority under the leadership of two insular organizations (Mindan and Chongryun) in Japan, and are instead actively involved in contesting Japanese state policies and social discrimination. This book not only offers a needed update on the changing role of Zainichi Koreans in the post-Cold War era; it is also timely as Japan faces new waves of immigrants.
According to yesterday's Phileleftheros, the results showed that the 23 workers have increased risk of heart diseases, diabetes, degenerative osteoarthritis, general complications like asthma depression, social discrimination, stroke and hypertension.
"Harassment" is a euphemism for daily threats of murder, beating, imprisonment, and torture, of 250 to 300 million Christians, while many more encounter social discrimination (housing, jobs) etc.
If it does so, it will be guilty of social discrimination every bit as great as the imposition of a fees system that threatens to make university education in England the exclusive preserve of the middle classes.
Southerners complain of economic and social discrimination at the hands of the northern-controlled Sanaa government.
The insidious poison of stigma for groups who are doubly afflicted by illness and social discrimination needs to be neutralized by efforts to change the sources.
Ethically, since "language death typically begins with political and social discrimination" (p.
By the way (1995) points out that "ageism" as a type of social discrimination has been neglected in the literature and this neglect necessitates a redefinition.
This was largely through bullying but was also enforced through physical violence, especially towards transvestite and Roma sex workers, whose experience was reported as relentless and brutal and connected with broader social discrimination. Preventing violence towards sex workers is a priority in Serbia, including monitoring violence, providing legal support to sex workers, and creating safer environments for sex work.
Individual social discrimination tests were conducted between native and alternate phenotypes in order to characterize individual social preferences based on the of visual cues for shoal interactions.
Could the considerable psychiatric comorbidity reflect more than social discrimination, but also this rare, complex, subjective disorientation towards one's body?
They also consider the roles of individuals and communities as they relate to citizenship in consumer society, economic contributions of society and community, and a spatial Keynesian approach to poverty and social discrimination. Distributed in the US by Palgrave Macmillan.