social history

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social history

historiography and historical analysis which concentrates attention on changes in the overall patterns of social life in societies, rather than merely on political events. see also HISTORY WORKSHOP JOURNAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
This essay considers the potential of histories of transnational movements of people, comparative histories of particular movements, and the erosion of boundaries between British domestic and imperial history, to expand and revise social histories of place.
But over the last few years, British television has produced a range of engaging social histories drawing on memory, testimony, archive and the inevitable re-tracing of steps.
By focusing on the human endeavor involved in the establishment and maintenance of interpersonal relationships, these essays avoid the broad quantitative nature of demographic social histories, but are also not divorced from social realities and material relationships as in more theoretically inclined cultural histories.
A valuable contribution to the social histories of medicine and technology, The Body Electric seeks to understand how and why users voluntarily "connected their bodies to machines" (p.
Partly because of further specialization and topical expansion, partly because of the distraction of the cultural turn, and partly perhaps because of partial incorporation into general textbooks, the effort do to general social histories of key areas has fallen by the wayside.
Nonetheless, in a less systematic way, social histories of the revolution have recently rebounded in a number of books and articles.
Moreover, social histories of the senses have still to inform even the most innovative cultural histories--I'm thinking especially of whiteness studies--some of which suffer from an unwitting visualism that in some important ways limits their larger explanative power about the meaning of "race", the ways in which it was defined, and the depth of American racism.