social parasitism

(redirected from Social parasite)

social parasitism

[′sō·shəl ′par·ə‚sə‚diz·əm]
(vertebrate zoology)
An aberrant type of parasitism occurring in some birds, in which the female of one species lays her eggs in the nests of other species and permits the foster parents to raise the young.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 -- In 1964, the USSR convicted Joseph Brodsky for writing poems and being a "social parasite".
Bagneres, "Divergence in cuticular chemical signatures between isolated populations of an intraspecific social parasite," Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, vol.
Brodsky might have, had he not been exiled from his country as a "social parasite." (On their worst days, poets sometimes wonder if what they do is useless.
Effect of the social parasite Sulcopolistes atrimandibularis on the population of its host, Polistes biglumis [Hyme-noptera: Vespidae].
From the perspective of evolutionary history, the American slave-making ant Protomognathus americanus is an old social parasite that is entirely dependent on other ant species for its survival.
No small size females, belonging to the social parasite species Ectatomma parasiticum, which resembled E.
With the unexpected arrival of Chris Flanders (Kevin Anderson), poet-artist and social parasite, Goforth suspects that death may have come a-calling.
Well because it is a four wheel drive with seven seats and agreeable dead cow upholstery, it says to 'rent a communist', contemplating his navel outside Heathrow departures, that you are a planet-killing social parasite likely to be spending some time hanging around a lamp-post come the revolution.
Using all three meanings of the word in French: a biological parasite, a social parasite, and static or noise, Serres (history of science, the Sorbonne) takes the parasite as a model of human interactions in the realms of logic, technology, work, the economy, and society.
Only, the type of moral judgment she chose to focus on was essentially puny: how sensitively one social parasite living off the murder of human beings treated another social parasite; manners of the salon and the table; delicate disquisitions on the fine feelings of gentlemen and ladies--but nothing about the fact that these quivering sensibilities were living off the brutalisation of hundreds and thousands of human beings; that in all meaningful senses they were mass murderers and beneficiaries of mass murder content to count themselves fortunate in that status.
Several patterns of (interspecific) social parasitism have been described for social insects, classified from least (e.g., temporary kleptoparasitism) to most "intimate" associations whereby the whole life cycle of the social parasite is completed within that of the host (see Stuart, 2002: 318-324).