Sod


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sod

a piece of grass-covered surface soil held together by the roots of the grass; turf
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sod

A thin block of grass held by its roots, usually used for turf and lawns, but can be used as a temporary building material. Like brick, sod is cut and laid in regular block shapes. The walls of a sod building are usually protected with a layer of stucco or wood panels. See also: Biomaterials
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sod

 

the surface layer of soil with interwoven live and dead roots, runners, and rhizomes of perennial grasses. Sod contains a large amount of organic matter. It is most developed in virgin steppes and in meadows, where it serves as an effective means of holding and absorbing moisture. The destruction of sod in plowing or by grazing often causes soil erosion. Sod protects the slopes of earthen structures from water and wind erosion. The best means of tilling sod on turfy arable soils is by plowing with plows having skim colters; the quality of the plowing is improved by preliminary disking. Turfy marshy soils are cultivated with rotary tillers or plows, followed by harrowing.


Sod

 

pieces of turf, cut mostly in rectangular sections. It is used for quickly grassing areas of ground not covered with vegetation, for strengthening slopes of dams and railroad beds, and for other purposes, such as for lawns and for repairing lawns when laying out public gardens.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sod

The upper layer of soil covered by grass and containing the grass roots.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to WMI, a two- or three-man crew is all that is needed to run the Turf Installer, which the company said can install 1000 sq.yd, of sod in 45 to 60 min.
The Legault's Sod Farm received the Timmins Chamber of Commerce Nova Award for Business of the Year, 1-5 employees.
Fence populations had an average forage yield 5.5 % higher than sod populations, a difference that was fairly consistent across harvest managements, test locations, and state-of-origin (Table 1).
One of the main objectives of our study was to examine gene expression of SOD isoenzymes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients receiving hemodialysis, to compare it with that from controls, and to determine which oxidative stress status parameters regulated expression of their genes.
SOD, CAT and TNF-[alpha] were higher in uterine tissues of DG compared with PG.
The amplification product 278 bp PCR product of third intron of copper-zinc (Cu-Zn) SOD gene were estimated.
In that case, enzymatic antioxidants like SOD, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and GST would be more efficient.
Subcellular localization and signal peptide of SOD proteins were predicted using ProtComp 9.0 (http://linux1.softberry.
We herein described the molecular cloning and characterization of Cu/Zn SOD gene from G.
It has been shown that SOD Ala-16Val polymorphism is an age-dependent modulator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in middle-aged males and elderly females.
This use of tundra sod, comprising blocks of intact soil with a fully developed plant canopy and root system, arose from Inupiaq peoples' use of sod blocks, sometimes called ivruq in Inupiaq, to construct traditional sod houses (Webster and Zibell, 1970; Arnold and Hart, 1992) and insulate the roofs of ice cellars.