sodium selenite


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sodium selenite

[′sōd·ē·əm ′sel·ə‚nīt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Na2SeO3·5H2O White, water-soluble crystals; used in glass manufacture, as a bacteriological reagent, and for decorating porcelain.
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Effects of dietary levels of selenium-enriched yeast and sodium selenite as selenium sources fed to growing-finishing pigs on performance, tissue selenium, serum glutathione peroxidase activity, carcass characteristics, and loin quality.
It can be argued that the studies show no standardization of the formula to be used (selenomethionine or sodium selenite), which is a relevant factor because they follow different metabolic pathways.
[45] performed an 8-week feeding trial to investigate effects of feed enrichment with sodium selenite, selenium nanoparticle (nano-Se), selenium yeast (Se-yeast).
Cataract induced by administration of a single dose of sodium selenite to sucking rats.
Effect of high-dose sodium selenite therapy on polymorphonuclear leukocyte apoptosis in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.
[24] conducted a study that evaluated the effect of supplementing diet with 200 [micro]g sodium selenite per day during 90 days on the level of TPOAb and TgAb in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis; 71 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis under therapy with levothyroxine and with high levels of TPOAb and/or TgAb were evaluated.
Because external intake is the most important source of Se in humans, understanding the toxicity of sodium selenite and bio-Se obtained from yeast is the key to the assessment of Se related health risks.
Supplemental Se sources are supplied as an inorganic complex, such as sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) or as part of organic molecules, such as selenomethionine from selenized yeast.
Liver mor-phology and histochemistry in rats resulting from inges-tion of sodium selenite and sodium fluoride.
A role for Se in Ebola treatment is also supported by the results of Chinese researchers, who treated patients in an outbreak of viral haemorrhagic fever with oral sodium selenite, obtaining dramatic reductions in mortality: after 9 days of Se dosage, the death rate fell from 100% (untreated) to 37% (treated) in the very severe cases, and from 22% to zero in the less severe cases (Hou, 1997)