Soest


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Soest

(zōst), city (1994 pop. 44,917), North Rhine–Westphalia, W Germany. It is a manufacturing city and an agricultural trade center. Known in the 7th cent., Soest is one of the oldest cities of Germany. It was the chief town of Westphalia in the Middle Ages and was a flourishing member of the Hanseatic League. Until the mid-15th cent. Soest was included in the archbishopric of Cologne and was later in the county of Mark (under the duke of Cleves); but it enjoyed virtual independence under its charter. The city passed to Brandenburg in 1614. Soest was badly damaged in World War II. Its noteworthy buildings include the St. Patroklidom (12th cent.), a Romanesque cathedral; the Romanesque Nicholas Chapel (c.1150); the Wiesenkirche (14th–15th cent.), a lovely late Gothic church; and many medieval and Renaissance-style houses. Much of the old city wall remains.
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Their former president, and now director of AGSoest, Fred Van Soest, Jr.
In both separate courses and those that incorporate material, researchers and educators concur that discussion of oppression and diversity can lead to student distress, defensiveness, shame, guilt, anger, and feelings of loss and grief (Akamatsu, 2000; Garcia & Van Soest, 1997; Sullivan & Johns, 2002; Tatum, 1992; Van Soest et al., 2001), as well as to student censorship of their views for fear of being harshly judged (Hyde & Ruth, 2002).
Overall social workers agree social justice entails equality in certain spheres to ascertain fair distribution of socio-economic-political resources for all people (Beverly and McSweeney, 1987; Reisch, 2002; Saleebey, 1990; Van Soest, 1994; Wakefield, 1988a).