Soft Scales

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Soft Scales

 

(Coccidae or Lecaniidae), a family of insects of the order Coccidia. Length, 3–7 mm. The adult female remains immobile on her eggs on a forage plant in order to protect them. The anterior pair of wings in the males is normally developed. Soft scales are widely distributed throughout the world but are most numerous in the tropics. There are more than 100 species in the USSR. Many (the wax scale, brown scale, and globose scale, for example) injure citrus trees, fruit trees, and ornamental and house plants.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
The soft scales of the white bark rubbed off the phosphorus, and the light went out.
* Of the sites surveyed by researchers, 81% had either soft scales or mealybugs, which are known to transmit leafroll viruses.
There are 22 families--with more than 7,300 species--the largest and most common being Diaspididae, or armored scales; Coccidae, or soft scales; and Pseudococcidae, commonly known as mealybugs.
Soft scales of the family Coccidae (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are phytophagous insects that infest leaves, branches and fruits of various plants.
Whiteflies, soft scales and armored scales were collected in different seasons on leaves and twigs of several plant species.
The crawlers (first instars) of soft scales do not appear to be sexually differentiated morphologically (Marotta 1997).
The Coccidae (soft scales) are the third largest family of scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) with approximately 1200 described species (Ben-Dov 1993).
Following this chapter, the various pests and their pathogens are described in individual chapters, respectively, for armored scales, soft scales and mealybugs, whiteflies and citrus blackfly, aphids, citrus psyllids, true bugs and sharpshooters, Lepidoptera, termites and ants, citrus root weevils, fruit flies, citrus thrips, grasshoppers, eriophyoid mites, and, finally, tetranychid and tenuipalpid mites.