soft systems methodology

(redirected from Soft systems methodologies)

soft systems methodology

formulated by Peter Checkland in the 1970s as a method of coming to terms with 'soft’ or ill-defined organizational problem contexts. The approach differs from traditonal management-oriented methods by virtue of its emphasis on learning, appreciative understanding and the recognition of different and competing ‘world views’. Originally the method was promoted as a 7-stage iterative model that could be used to explore problem contexts encouraging iteration of polemical debate until a universal world view or ‘accommodation of interests’ could be achieved. SYSTEMS THEORY was used extensively in the original formulation; concentrating on emergent properties and holism rather than the reductionist techniques found in other approaches. In 1992 the methodology was reformulated in the face of its critics (Flood, Jackson & Keys 1990 et al) in order to focus more on learning and process, rather than formal systems theory
References in periodicals archive ?
Combinations of SSM and Additional Methods Mingers and Gill (1997) describe combinations of different soft systems methodologies. The authors developed a multi-methodology framework with a focus on using parts of methods to create the best methodology for the problem situation.
(1990), Soft Systems Methodologies in Action, Wiley, Chichester.
SURVEY ON THE USE OF HARD AND SOFT SYSTEMS METHODOLOGIES IN THE UK AND FRANCE
In the UK side, it is worth reporting that SAST, CS and IP were the least used soft systems methodologies; well above three quarters of the respondents claimed never to have used these techniques in management practice.
In response, Checkland and Scholes released Soft Systems Methodologies In Action (1990), a book designed to document the developments of SSM over the previous 10 years.