Soil Leaching

Soil Leaching

 

the washing of water-soluble compounds out of the soil and the movement of a portion of the colloids into lower layers or subsoil rock. It is caused by a downward flow of water and affects mainly soils that are developing under conditions of elutriation, when the influx of moisture from atmospheric precipitation exceeds its outflow in evap-oration and transportation by plants. In the USSR such soils are, for example, leached chernozems and soils of the more northern latitudes. Elements of plant nutrition are lost as a result of leaching. The term “leaching” is often used as a synonym for “desalinization”: leaching facilitates the exploitation and raises the fertility of saline soils.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the treatments with soil leaching, a PVC hose (5/16" x 0.
2013), evidences that, despite the positive effect of soil leaching, this practice does not avoid the increment of salts in the soils through the irrigation with water of increasing salinity.
But excessive use of any pesticide results in the development of chemical toxicity for humans, animals, and environment owing to soil leaching and water contamination.
Closed periods NEW research has shown that, except for sandy/shallow soils, extending the closed winter period for spreading slurry would reduce soil leaching of nitrates.
Biochar is a modern concept derived from Amazonian Indians who used charcoal to help stabilize soil minerals in a part of the world plagued by excessive water and soil leaching.
Nitrate contamination of groundwater from soil leaching is a potential health hazard (Dorsch et al.
Replicate stakelets were subjected to soil leaching at five different laboratories using small pots with drain holes that contained locally obtained soil at each of the five laboratories: USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) soil from Wisconsin; Arch Wood Protection Inc.
The use in this study of undisturbed soil monoliths and lysimeter sealing techniques to remove edge-flow effects represents an improvement in the accuracy of previous soil leaching studies (Cameron et al.
Advanced computer tools provide opportunities to combine knowledge of soil leaching processes with existing spatial information describing land use, climate, and soils to predict groundwater contamination.
The Soil-Pesticide Interaction Screening Procedure is based on a 4-by-4 matrix classifying the potential pesticide loss according to combinations of four pesticide leaching classes and four soil leaching classes.