Waste management

(redirected from Solid-waste management)
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Waste management

The process of collecting, recycling, and disposing of waste materials produced by human activities. Waste management involves solid, liquid, and gaseous substances, some of which can be hazardous. As such, each requires a different method and procedure to process. Solid waste, such as wood, concrete, glass, drywall, and asphalt shingles, is the primary type of waste produced by buildings.

waste management

1. In the public sector, a systems approach to the efficient control of the disposal of waste in a community or region; requires the establishment of a policy regarding environmental standards, the collection and treatment of wastes, the monitoring of air, soil, and water quality, and the enforcement of established regulations.
2. In for-profit organizations, the carrying out of similar functions, with the exception of enforcement.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are two key components to the GFOA's recommended practice on applying full-cost accounting to municipal solid-waste management operations, which are described in the paragraphs that follow.
In current practice, solid-waste management operations are commonly accounted for in either or both types of funds.
Such a focus is incompatible with full-cost accounting, which, as its name implies, is primarily concerned with the cost of providing solid-waste management services.
The GFOA's recommended practice recognizes that FCA requires the gathering of cost information for solid-waste management operations on an accrual basis.
a government can use one or more proprietary funds (which use accrual accounting) to account for all or a portion of the government's solid-waste management operations, or
There are a number of specific activities associated with municipal solid-waste management.
In practice, many key decisions involving solid-waste management will focus on the cost of a given program path rather than on the cost of a specific activity.
Governments provide varying combinations of solid-waste management services (e.
1) The second step in the process of implementing FCA is to identify all of the direct costs associated with each of the solid-waste management activities identified in step one.
In the context of FCA, indirect costs can be defined as costs that benefit solid-waste management activities, but that would continue to exist for the benefit of other programs were the benefitting solid-waste management activities to cease.
Only a portion of total indirect costs should be considered to be costs of a government's solid-waste management program.
Revenues related to solid-waste programs that 1) are not generated through normal collection rates or tipping fees and that 2) would cease to exist for the benefit of other programs were the solid-waste management program to be eliminated are typically treated as an offset to cost.