melting point

(redirected from Solidus temperature)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Solidus temperature: Liquidus

melting point,

temperaturetemperature,
measure of the relative warmth or coolness of an object. Temperature is measured by means of a thermometer or other instrument having a scale calibrated in units called degrees. The size of a degree depends on the particular temperature scale being used.
..... Click the link for more information.
 at which a substance changes its state from solid to liquid. Under standard atmospheric pressure different pure crystalline solids will each melt at a different specific temperature; thus melting point is a characteristic of a substance and can be used to identify it. When heat is applied continuously and in sufficient quantity to such solids, the temperature rises steadily until it reaches the point at which liquefaction occurs. Here the rise ceases and no further change in temperature is observed until all of the substance has been converted to liquid. The heat being applied to the substance at that temperature is consumed in bringing about the change of state, and none is available to raise the temperature of that part of the substance already liquefied until all of it has changed to the liquid. If heat is still applied when liquefaction is complete, the temperature will begin to rise again. The quantity of heat necessary to change one gram of any substance from solid to liquid at its melting point is known as its latent heatlatent heat,
heat change associated with a change of state or phase (see states of matter). Latent heat, also called heat of transformation, is the heat given up or absorbed by a unit mass of a substance as it changes from a solid to a liquid, from a liquid to a gas, or the
..... Click the link for more information.
 of fusion and differs for different substances. Ice, for example, requires approximately 80 calories of heat to change each gram to water at its melting point. Because its heat of fusion is relatively high, ice is used in refrigeration. In freezing (the reverse process, i.e., the change from liquid to solid), heat is given off by the substance undergoing the change, and the amount given off is the same as that absorbed in melting.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Melting Point

 

(mp), the temperature of the equilibrium phase transition of a crystalline (solid) body to liquid at a constant external pressure. The melting point is a particular case of the temperature of the first-order phase transition. The melting points of several substances at standard pressure (760 mm Hg, or 101,325 newtons per m2) are shown in Table 1.

Table 1
Substancemp (°C)
Hydrogen ...............–259.14
Oxygen ...............–218.4
Nitrogen ...............– 209.86
Argon ...............–189.2
Ethyl alcohol ...............–112.0
Methyl alcohol ...............–97.8
Acetone ...............–94.6
Mercury ...............–38.9
Ethylone glycol ...............–15.6
Nitrobenzene ...............5.7
Acetic acid ...............16.7
Glycerine ...............17.9
Cesium ...............28.5
Naphthalene ...............80.2
Sodium ...............97.8
Iodine ...............112.9
D-Camphor ...............178.5
Aluminum ...............660.37
Copper ...............1083.4
Iron ...............1539.0
Tungsten ...............3410.0

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

melting point

[′melt·iŋ ‚pȯint]
(thermodynamics)
The temperature at which a solid of a pure substance changes to a liquid. Abbreviated mp.
For a solution of two or more components, the temperature at which the first trace of liquid appears as the solution is heated.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

melting point

the temperature at which a solid turns into a liquid. It is equal to the freezing point
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Water lowers the solidus temperatures in the mantle and crust because it weakens mineral structures.
Strain rates next to the spherical ends were even slightly negative around solidus temperature when the mold was preheated to 644F (340C).
The heating for recrystallization at temperature lower than solidus temperature achieves, in fact, lower grain size, but the heating up to the semisolid state introduces new mechanisms as coarsening that leads to a bigger grain size, but this new grain is, still, smaller than that produced by EMS [9].
Experimental evaluation at temperatures close to the solidus temperature is difficult and hence "an educated guess frequently replaces experimental proof" [11].
The solder Zn (wt.%) Ga (wt.%) Sn (wt.%) alloys Sn-9Zn 9 0 Balance Sn-9Zn-0.25Ga 9 0.25 Balance Sn-9Zn-0.50Ga 9 0.50 Balance Sn-9Zn-0.75Ga 9 0.75 Balance Sn-9Zn-1.00Ga 9 1.00 Balance TABLE 2: The comparison of solidus temperature ([T.sub.onset]), liquidus temperature ([T.sub.end]), pasty ranges ([T.sub.end]/ [T.sub.onset]), melting temperature ([T.sub.m]), A/m, and AH among various solder alloys.
Since the above reactions took place below the MgO-[SiO.sub.2] solidus temperature of 2,809F (1,5430 and below the [Al.sub.2][0.sub.3]-[SiO.sub.2] solidus temperature of 2,894F (1,5900, a solid mixture of MgO, [Al.sub.2][O.sub.3] and [SiO.sub.2] is formed.
Potentially, a similar approach could be used to develop an algorithm for the calculation of the solidus temperature of other light alloys.
The growth of the primary interlocking dendrites commonly associated with long freezing range alloys is present with some residual liquid film close to the solidus temperature of the alloy.
This leads to a high rate of energy transfer and temperature control, allowing the solution heat treated castings to function at temperatures close to the solidus temperature and reducing the net solution heat treating time.
However, at 0.42 seconds, the temperature of the fluid distribution in the new design fell below the solidus temperature, and the filling was stopped before completion.
When a part of the casting is simultaneously being rapidly stretched (undergoing high rates of strain) and is at or near the solidus temperature, this is a high-risk area for hot tearing.
Considering that the strength during solidification would reach about 1 MPa at the solidus temperature, it is clear that the maximum packing point represents the most significant change in properties, whereas only small changes in strength occur between coherency and maximum packing.