solomon's seal


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Solomon's seal

any of several liliaceous plants of the genus Polygonatum of N temperate regions, having greenish or yellow paired flowers, long narrow waxy leaves, and a thick underground stem with prominent leaf scars
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solomon's seal

solomon's seal

Drooping, white-yellow-green elliptical oval flowers, hanging in pairs of 2 or 3. Large broad leaves alternating on stem. Young shoots can be boiled and eaten like asparagus. Root is edible after baking in hot sun or boiling in 3 changes of water. Tea made from dried root is used for wasting diseases like tuberculosis, and diabetes, indigestion, lung problems, sleep, rheumatism, laxative, hemorrhoids, bowel problems, arthritis and to slow heavy menstrual flow. Berries not edible.

Solomon’s Seal

 

any one plant of the genus Polygonatum of the family Liliaceae. Solomon’s seals are perennial herbs with ovate or elliptical leaves and thick horizontal rootstocks. The latter are marked with rounded seal-like scars where the old stems have disappeared. Each leaf axil has one to four bisexual flowers. The tubular perianth is greenish white or sometimes pink. The fruit is a berry. There are more than 30 species (according to other data, as many as 50), distributed primarily in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Seventeen species are found in the USSR, among forests (predominantly mixed and deciduous forests), thickets, and meadows. The best-known species are sweet-scented Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum odoratum; formerly P. officinale), with one or two flowers in each axil, and common Solomon’s seal (P. multiflorum), with two to five flowers in each axil. Some species of Solomon’s seal are cultivated as ornamentals.

References in periodicals archive ?
Star Flowered Solomon's Seal Smilacina stellata is a mid size plant growing 20-50 cm (8-20 in) tall.
It includes, for example, lady's mantle, bloodroot, bleeding heart, Solomon's seal, trillium, cranesbill, hosta, goatsbeard, foamflower, astilbe and all kinds of ferns and sedges.
Solomon's seal, lily-of-thevalley, woodruff, celandines, lungworts, primroses, as well as a woodland bulbs including snowdrops, daffodils and bluebells, are all native woodland plants and all are lovely.
For pure aesthetics, their plantings include rattle trap, wild ginger, wild geranium, Solomon's seal, rose mallow, cardinal flower, New England aster, wild oats, purple cone flower, stiff switch grass, wild petunia, little blue stem, downy skullcap, wild columbine and many other all-American beauties.
- This landscape is shaded by incense cedar trees and includes Italianate planters and benches; espaliered apple and pear trees; and a wide variety of plants, from Welsh poppies and Solomon's Seal to weeping cotoneaster.
Peonies show off, two or three to a vase, overlooked by curving branches of solomon's seal in silvery bottles.
Solomon's Seal is a local woodland herb especially good for creaky joints because of its soothing and moistening nature.
"Solomon's Seal" carved in the early 14th century provides clues, and a Victorian statue of John the Evangelist could be mistaken for a portrayal of a woman.
Solomon's Seal has white flowers that dangle like bells from the leaf axis on an unbranched, arching stem.
In early spring bergenia, aka pigsqueak or elephant-ears, opens pink or purple blooms, followed by Solomon's seal, which grows arching stems dangling numerous white, bell-shaped flowers.
Within three years after we stopped mowing, colonies of Solomon's seal, wild strawberries, lady fern, and several rare wood violets appeared.
Witch hazels do well in shade and if there are clumps of woodlanders such as Solomon's seal and lily-of-the-valley nearby, they really add to the show.