Somali Current

Somali Current

[sə′mäl·ē ′kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Somali Current

 

a surface current in the northwestern part of the Indian Ocean, off the eastern coast of the Somali Peninsula (Horn of Africa). It is caused by monsoonal winds, and its direction changes with the seasons. In winter its temperature is 25.5°–26.5°C, and it flows south-southwest, becoming an equatorial countercurrent south of the equator. In summer the temperature drops to 21°–25°C as a result of the upwelling of bottom water along the African coast. The Somali Current is the beginning of the general eastern drift. It flows at a rate of 1–3 km per hr.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is commonly known as Somali Current which is recorded every year during May and June.
The aptly named "Somali current", a continuous move- ment of seawater as strong as 3 metres per second that runs the length of the Somali coast, provides ideal conditions for generating marine power.
The aptly named "Somali current", a continuous movement of seawater as strong as 3 metres per second that runs the length of the Somali coast, provides ideal conditions for generating marine power.

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