Sombrero galaxy


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Sombrero galaxy

(som-brair -oh) (M104; NGC 4594) A spiral (Sa/Sb) galaxy in the constellation Virgo that has a relatively large bright nucleus and lies at a distance of 15 Mpc. The spiral structure is difficult to trace because the galaxy appears almost edge-on. A dark absorption band of interstellar dust in the galactic plane is clearly visible against the bright bulge component.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Sombrero galaxy

[səm′brer·ō ′gal·ik·sē]
(astronomy)
A spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo that is seen nearly edge-on, having a recession velocity of approximately 910 kilometers per second (565 miles per second).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Now we leap more than 100 times farther, to the Sombrero Galaxy, M104, in the constellation Virgo, whose light reaches us from across 31 million light-years.
It has often been noted that this bar is similar to that seen in M104, the Sombrero galaxy, although not as prominent as in the Sombrero.
The image is of the Sombrero Galaxy - a staggering 28million light years from Earth.
This galaxy is commonly known as the Sombrero galaxy. The Sombrero is one of the most massive objects at the southern edge of the Virgo cluster of galaxies.
NASA released images of the galaxy called Messier 104, which is commonly known as the Sombrero galaxy because in visible light it resembles a broad-brimmed Mexican hat.
And from the confines of the domed building, he uses his 12-inch telescope, pointing through a slit in the roof, to gaze at Jupiter, Saturn and other planets as well as distant heavenly bodies like the Sombrero Galaxy.
A spiral galaxy like M104, the Sombrero Galaxy, might present a more dynamic composition if you rotated your camera slightly so that the long-axis of the target cuts across the frame diagonally rather than straight across.
This is because, like the Sombrero Galaxy (page 30), NGC 4565 is not absolutely edge-on: its south face is turned slightly toward us.
Not a member of this cluster and 20 million l.y closer, lies M104, the Sombrero Galaxy. Seen edge-on, it is a popular photographic subject and closely resembles the Mexican head gear for which it is named.
It's just beautiful in the field of view with the Sombrero Galaxy (M104) through my 130-mm refractor at 48x.
The Sombrero Galaxy (M104) in Virgo is 40 million light-years away.