Song of Roland

Song of Roland

chanson de geste of Roland and Charlemagne. [Fr. Lit.: Song of Roland]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
This is her lament, her song of Roland, but it is also her fictive attempt to come to terms with her own abuse of her son and her fear of his strange nature" (80).
Earlier this year, the square staged contemporary artist Wael Shawky's "The Song of Roland: The Arabic Version," which saw the medieval European tale of Muslim-Christian conflict retold in a choral mode, specifically fidjeri associated with the Gulf's pearl harvesting tradition.
Duggan, The Song of Roland: Formulaic Style and Poetic Craft (Berkeley: Univ.
Chapter 3 is an interesting study of the Song of Roland and related chivalric literature.
Their topics include whether the Song of Roland's Roncevalles is a military satire, chivalry and honor-violence in late medieval Florence, morality and legality in late medieval England: the evidence of Benedictine sermon collections, a reconsideration of Middle Welsh literature as historical evidence for social violence, and sword-made men: mystical armament and earthly authority in Malory's Le Morte Darthur.
Oliver is in fact a Viking name originally being Olaf, but it became popular in France because of the epic The Song of Roland in which a character called Olivier was Roland's advisor.
Oliver is in fact a Viking name, originally being V Olaf, f but it became popular in France because of the epic The Song of Roland in which a character called Olivier was Roland's advisor.
Red Tails (whose martial imagery is among the most seductive since The Song of Roland) sadly lacks most of these qualities.
Their greatest moments come in the Song of Roland, which depicts their defence of Charlemagne's army against the Saracens of Al-Andalus, and their deaths at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass.
She shows how, beginning with his translation of the major French works Tristan and Isolde and The Song of Roland, Bedier, who was from the island of Reunion, instigated an image of France's greatness that became widely accepted and employed in such venues as the Paris Exposition of 1900, which is discussed at length.
Kelly's discussion of The Song of Roland (117-78) is equally strong.
Strictly speaking, "chanson" refers to French secular songs that date back to the medieval Song of Roland, an epic poem, and the musical tradition that followed.