Soninke

Soninke

 

(also Sarakole), a people living mainly in northern Mali and also in regions of Upper Volta, Senegal, Mauritania, and Gambia that border on Mali. The Soninke, who number approximately 800,000 (1973, estimate), speak a language that belongs to the northern group of the Mande family. The majority of the Soninke are Sunni Muslims. The Soninke formed the ethnic basis of the medieval state of Ghana. Most Soninke are engaged in land cultivation, growing millet, maize, and legumes, and in transhumant stock raising, principally of camels, goats, and sheep. Large numbers of Soninke migrate for seasonal work on peanut plantations in Senegal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sarr ably demonstrates how, from the days of the Soninke rulers to the times of British colonialism, land became a tool for power grab and control.
Ten (2.2%) patients were black Africans (i.e., persons of Pular [also known as Peul] and Soninke ethnicity), and 2 (0.4%) patients were foreign expatriates.
She guides the reader past points of contemporary and modern speculation, as well as debate, for example, about the Almoravid conquest of Soninke Ghana, Ibn Tumart's legendary meeting with al-Ghazali, and interpretations of Almohad terminology, sometimes with extended elaboration of the points at issue.
The Nande of Kivu in eastern DRC, Mouride of Senegalese, Soninke of Ghana, the Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo of present day Nigeria amongst many other groups established trade settlements and operated through trade networks that connected many locations.
Languages: Arabic (official and national), Pular, Soninke, Wolof (all national languages), French
The proportions of circumcised girls are higher in rural areas (34%) than in urban areas (22%), and most ethnic groups concerned by these practices are the Mandingo (82%), Soninke (65%), Pular (65%) and Diola (52%).
There is Soninke Whispers, 2017, for example, a beautiful portrait of a powerful African (or AfroBrazilian) young woman, and Under Construction, a haunting portrayal of a young black man, whose slight smile seems to be an attempt at hiding emotional pain.
There are several major Malian groups: Bambara, Fulani, Tuareg, Soninke, Senufo, Songhai, and Mandinka.
The film, whose title is Soninke for "Our House", is inspired by real events and is a metaphor for the unsettled state of Cisse's homeland.