Betamax

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Betamax

The first popular consumer VCR on the market. Using half-inch (analog) tape cassettes, Sony introduced Betamax, also known as "Beta," in 1975. The first cassettes held only one hour of video, but the capacity was subsequently increased to two hours in order to hold an entire movie. Sony later introduced Beta Hi-fi, which improved audio quality, and SuperBeta, which offered a better image.

Beta vs. VHS
One year after Beta was introduced, the VHS format came out in a slightly larger cassette that held a full movie from the start. For several years, pre-packaged movies were offered in both Beta and VHS. By the late 1980s, Beta had been almost entirely eclipsed by VHS, although Betamax machines were still manufactured by Sony until 2002.

The Betamax technology was considered to be better quality than VHS, and to this day, "Betamaxed" refers to a superior technology overtaken by an inferior one (see Beta/VHS debacle). See VHS, Cartrivision, helical scan and Betacam.
References in periodicals archive ?
He analyzes the application of the Supreme Court's Sony Betamax case to such technologies as TiVo, MP3 players, and satellite radio; discusses the litigation brought by the music and motion picture industries against peer-to-peer networks such as Kazaa and BitTorrent; and explores challenges to copyright law resulting from the practice of audio and audio-visual "mash ups." He also looks at the development of special protections for technological protection measures, the legal issues surrounding copyright law and Internet search engines, and the emergence of the Creative Commons movement.
In 1976, Universal Studios and Walt Disney Productions, which held numerous television programming copyrights, sued the manufacturers and marketers of the Sony Betamax, a leading consumer video tape recorder.
Chapter 2 is the most fascinating account of the evolution of consumer preferences around electronic formats (VHS vs Sony Betamax) and the commitments made by major firms to dominate the emerging market in the 1970s and 1980s.
The final chapter in the second section is dedicated to "The Filesharing Movement," portraying the importance of law and government over "a technology designed to be impossible to control." (11) The discussion in this section is supported by a review of American case law starting with the Sony Betamax (12) case and ending with Grokster.
Duteau sold guitars, drums, amplifiers, public address systems, stereos, speakers, Sony Betamax videocassette recorders, VHS videocassette recorders and, of course, movies in Betamax, VHS and now DVD formats.
The one with the highest score on the night after the Gold Cup wins a Sony Betamax video of 'Festivals We Have Loved'.
the "Betamax case"), a case brought by the movie industry to ban the Sony Betamax VCR, the Supreme Court found that contributory infringement liability could not reach the manufacturer of a device that is "capable of substantial noninfringing use." In that case, the Supreme Court found that the VCR was capable of several noninfringing uses, including the time-shifting of television broadcasts by home viewers.
417 (1984), a Supreme Court case that resolved the copyright status of the Sony Betamax, a predecessor of today's video cassette recorders.
Word Perfect word-processing technology, and Sony Betamax vs.
Then the contest was between the technically superior Sony Betamax and the more commercially popular - and ultimately victorious - VHS.
Sony Betamax case, the Supreme Court opens up home entertainment when it rules that home taping is not a copyright infringement.