Soranus


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Soranus

(sərā`nəs), fl. 1st–2d cent. A.D., Greek physician, probably b. Ephesus. He is believed to have practiced in Alexandria and in Rome and was an authority on obstetrics, gynecology, and pediatrics. His treatise On Midwifery and the Diseases of Women (tr. 1882) remained an influential work until the 16th cent.
References in periodicals archive ?
By explaining the necessity of pushing stones causing urinary retention with a proper catheter into the bladder, Soranus of Ephesus (98-138 A.D.) well described that catheters could also be used for the treatment of occlusive urethral stones or bladder stones (4).
It has been placed as an imperative medication even in earliest literature by Hippocrates, Soranus, Dioscorides and Pliny6,7.
In the first century of the Anno Domini the first Roman texts, by Soranus and Galen, discussed childcare [14].
Soranus was the first to propose perineal compresses to support the perineum and to prevent tears of the soft birth canal during fetal head passage (1).
Para hallar una representacion grafica del utero femenino, no hace falta esperar a la que hallamos en el siglo IX en el tratado ginecologico, que interpretaba el dibujo del utero que describiera Soranus de Efeso (98-138 d.
The limb and spinal deformities caused by vitamin D deficiency were known to the Romans, being described in two medical texts (e.g., Soranus 1991:Book II; see Rajakumar 2003).
In addition, the most extensive presentation of the disease in ancient times, that of Caelius Aurelianus (5th AD c.), which was a Latin translation of Soranus of Ephesus (1st/2nd AD c.) work (5), was devoted to the treatment of the disease, while the cause and the signs were limited to only few paragraphs, being inferior in comparison to that of Aretaeus of Cappadocia.
In our practice, we sit down to perform a vaginal delivery, as taught by Soranus of Ephesus.
However, I think it is more likely that the initially stronger resonance of the "nymph" in Nymphomania was "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" as a term for the clitoris, following a tradition of Ancient Greek anatomical texts such as Soranus' Gynecology (1.18): the term would literally mean mania of the clitoris.
(1) mentioned uterine inversion, as did Soranus of Ephesus in 110 A.D., (2,3,4) but it was not until the 16th century during the time of Ambroise-Pare, that it was understood.
A physician of the time, Soranus, who lived around 100 years BC concluded from his observations of this illness that the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was more severe when there was a male foetus (Moshe et al, 1994, p.