sousveillance


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

sousveillance

The recording of the environment from a person's vantage point in the course of everyday activities. Coined by lifecaster Steve Mann and pronounced "soo-VAY-lens," it refers to wearable cameras and vehicle dashboard-mounted cameras, whereas surveillance refers to stationary cameras on walls and telephone poles. In French, "sur" means "above," and "sous" means "below." See lifecasting, POV camera, dashcam and surveillance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mann S, Nolan J and Wellman B (2002) Sousveillance: Inventing and using wearable computing devices for data collection in surveillance environments.
(2010): 'The generalized sousveillance society', en Social Science Information, no 49 (3), pp.
On the other hand, in "'Sousveillance': Inverse Surveillance in Multimedia Imaging," Steve Mann describes sousveillance as a form of observation that functions through the gaze of individuals: "The word sur-veillance denotes a God's eye view from on high (i.e., French for 'to watch from above').
Vian Bakir's Torture, Intelligence and Sousveillance in the War on Terror examines how this early revelation of abuse forced an international debate, how an earlier revelation (that of 'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh) failed and what drove subsequent successes in exposing and drawing global attention to the use of torture.
From the foregoing discussion, the principles of Sousveillance Environments with HI (by Mann) and Ecological, Digital and Knowledge Environments with Future of Intellectual Property (by Boyle) could be taken as a foundation to raise Cyber-Luddites and to create Cyber-Luddism Societies (not a Society).
But most importantly, I want to help hasten our inevitable sousveillance future.
His current research investigates the intersection of cell phone video cameras as a technology of ubiquitous sousveillance with policing, particularly police brutality.
In addition to wrecking the careers of prominent politicians (e.g., one can think of the comical Weinergate here), such personalized access to media, countersurveillance, and sousveillance has also been used to great effect by Occupy Wall Street.
Something like the idea of the monitorial citizen also finds its theorization in Steve Mann's concept of sousveillance, See Vian Bakir, Sousveillance, Media and Strategic Political Communication: Iraq, USA, UK, London, Continuum, 2010.
The ubiquity of digital cameras today, including video streams from cell phones, has prompted discussions of a new culture of "sousveillance." As Clive Thompson noted in 2011, "Right now, sousveillance requires an act of will; you have to pull out your phone when you see something fishy.
A media expert said the teenager had become a victim of a new phenomenon known as "sousveillance" .