Sovetskii Ekran

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sovetskii Ekran

 

(The Soviet Screen), an illustrated magazine published once every two weeks. Sovetskii ekran was founded in 1925 in Moscow as a supplement to Kinogazeta (Cinema Newspaper). It was published under various names in the 1930’s and was not published from 1941 to 1957. It has been published regularly since January 1957. Originally an organ of the Ministry of Culture of the USSR, it became an organ of both the Ministry of Culture of the USSR and the Union of Workers in Cinematography in July 1959 and an organ of the State Committee on Cinematography of the Council of Ministers of the USSR and of the Cinematographers’ Union of the USSR in January 1966. Sovetskii ekran publishes articles on the theory of film-making, film reviews, and biographical sketches of actors, film directors, and cameramen. The magazine is intended for the general reader. Circulation, approximately 2 million (1975).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
16, 17, 19, 20 (Zagranichnye kinofil'my, kotorye ne sleduet vypuskat' na sovetskii ekran, received 11 August 1948).
Beginning in the early 1960s, such ideas coalesced in the mass-circulation film magazine Sovetskii ekran with its annual "competition" (konkurs), later to be a model for more rigorous audience research.
Letters from Sovetskii ekran readers and statements from filmmakers, workers in distribution, and critics expressed intense unhappiness with the cultural work that criticism performed, precisely because it seemed out of touch with prevailing popular opinion.
Sovetskii ekran published Vysotskii's theme song, "Proshchanie s gorami" (Farewell to the Mountains), in late 1968 but provided no promotion of the picture or plot analysis.
Rather than the specific features of Vertikal', its importance was contained in the particular dimensions of its success, which could be gauged sociodemographically with such questionnaires as Sovetskii ekran and sociologists were promoting.
Autonomously produced studies, like the Sovetskii ekran competition, inevitably fell under the control of leading sociologists like Kogan and Furikov and, later, Igor' Rachuk and the NIKFI lab.