agitprop

(redirected from Soviet propaganda)
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agitprop

1. (formerly) a bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, in charge of agitation and propaganda on behalf of Communism
2. 
a. any promotion, as in the arts, of political propaganda, esp of a Communist nature
b. (as modifier): agitprop theatre
References in periodicals archive ?
28) For the Soviet Union as a whole, see Karel Berkhoff, Motherland in Danger: Soviet Propaganda during World War II (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012), 70-74.
Thus, Hicks identifies the history of Soviet Holocaust films as a global one: while the Soviet propaganda machine suppressed depictions of Nazi anti-Semitism, the West's scepticism of Stalinist ideology often prevented these early, though marginalised, images of the Holocaust from being acknowledged internationally.
Archival sources provide glimpses of popular reactions to the twists and turns of Soviet propaganda but constitute no more than anecdotal evidence.
But this does not eliminate the fact that these policies were adopted based on geostrategic calculations related to the Cold War and the international chess game, rather than on ideological bases or in accordance with the "friendship among all the peoples" that filled the hearts of the leaders of the "loyal friend," as it used to be claimed by the Soviet propaganda at the time.
By the time he left in 1946 he 'no longer believed the myth that Soviet propaganda had .
The estimate then was that of 750,000 Lithuanians in capitalist countries, about a third harbored benevolent feelings toward the Soviet Union and worked in concert with Soviet aims, thus becoming an important asset to the Soviet propaganda campaign (Vinogradov 1955).
The arrival of a traveling cinema of Soviet propaganda films in a remote Romanian village signals a cultural invasion of a particularly unwelcome kind in Titus Muntean's 1959-set "Kino Caravan.
Her stunning 2007 debut at Metro Pictures, for example, featured large-scale collaged paintings that blended photographs and text from American and Soviet propaganda magazines with imagery from Poland's 1980s punk scene.
As late as 1980, the Soviet propaganda machine convinced the world that it would soon overtake America economically and militarily even as its industry was crumbling.
The main composition on the program in each city was the Peace and Friendship Symphony, a name that recalls a popular Soviet propaganda theme to older Europeans.
As Soviet authorities forbid travel outside of the Soviet Union, America was a black hole to most Soviet citizens; they had only Soviet propaganda, which was usually inaccurate and often malicious, from which to form their perceptions of the United States.
public diplomacy efforts, with a primary mission of combating Soviet propaganda and the spread of communism.