agitprop

(redirected from Soviet propaganda)
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agitprop

1. (formerly) a bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, in charge of agitation and propaganda on behalf of Communism
2. 
a. any promotion, as in the arts, of political propaganda, esp of a Communist nature
b. (as modifier): agitprop theatre
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, during the war Soviet propaganda further deemphasized its socialist internationalist origins, replacing it with more accessible and inclusive patriotic messages.
The revelation of the death camps questioned the priorities of Soviet propaganda. Hicks discusses an image of Jewish prayer shawls shot for but never featured in the final version of Auschwitz (Elizaveta Svilova, 1945) as well as fourteen disregarded reels shot for films about Majdanek.
David Brandenberger's study concentrates on Soviet propaganda in the 1930s, the period when Stalin's personality cult was established and dogmatic ideological control was asserted over all forms of communication.
The "Russian Textile: Printed Cotton from Traditional Patterns to Soviet Propaganda Design" will run until December 8, 2013 at the Bahrain National Museum.
This, unfortunately; is necessary to combat the great effect Soviet propaganda had on portraying him (and the Greco-Catholics in general) as anti-Semites and Nazi collaborators.
There is evidence to suggest that at least some Soviet Jewish families owe their lives to these films, which taught them not to trust Soviet propaganda and prodded them to escape to safely.
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, a dean at the center, said that the pig was a disgusting medieval anti-Semitic caricature which had been widely used by both Nazi and Soviet propaganda to incite hatred against all the Jews in the world.
Two-page thematic mini-chapters present information on sickness and health, rulers of the Iron Age, the rise of Rome, early American civilizations, China's golden age, the Crusades, the Enlightenment, the industrial revolution, British colonialism, soviet propaganda, the Iranian revolution.
Journalists of international acclaim such as the 1932 Pulitzer Prize winner Walter Duranty were seduced by the Soviet propaganda machine into allowing their hearts to overrule their heads and their responsibilities as journalists.
But is there any truth to this claim, or was it just Soviet propaganda?
The argument is largely academic - it is debatable whether the Welsh Government could stop councils printing them even if it wanted to - but there has been little discussion of the role of what English Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles dubs "town hall Pravdas", after the Soviet propaganda sheet.
"It's in the style of pure Soviet propaganda, of totalitarian propaganda."