Spahis


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Spahis

or

Sipahis

(spä`hē), Ottoman cavalrycavalry,
a military force consisting of mounted troops trained to fight from horseback. Horseback riding probably evolved independently in the Eurasian steppes and the mountains above the Mesopotamian plain. By 1400 B.C.
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. The Spahis were organized in the 14th cent. on a feudal basis. The officers held fiefs (timars) granted to them by the sultan and commanded the personal loyalty of the peasants who worked the land. The Spahis were entitled to all income from the fief in return for military service to the sultan. Until the mid-16th cent. they provided the bulk of the Ottoman army. Committed to the tradition of light cavalry, they were slow to adopt firearms, whose development made the cavalry less important. They remained politically important until Mahmud IIMahmud II,
1784–1839, Ottoman sultan (1808–39), younger son of Abd al-Hamid I. He was raised to the throne of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey) upon the deposition of his brother, Mustafa IV, and continued the reforms of his cousin, Selim III.
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 revoked their fiefs in 1828, two years after he crushed the JanissariesJanissaries
[Turk.,=recruits], elite corps in the service of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). It was composed of war captives and Christian youths pressed into service; all the recruits were converted to Islam and trained under the strictest discipline.
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 with modern artillery in his effort to build a modern army. In the French army certain Algerian and Senegalese cavalry units were also called Spahis. The term is sometimes spelled Sepahis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now there was less emphasis on recruitment of Spahis than of Tirailleurs Algeriens.
While definitive evidence has not yet surfaced, it is believed these carbines were produced for the Spahis Cavalry units of the Coloniale Armee des Afrique.
Spahis (2002) provides an overview of constructing a family pedigree.
The French cavalry regiment consisted of North African troops--two squadrons of Spahis and two squadrons of Chasseurs d'Afrique.
The capture of Napoleon III, the withdrawal of the Spahis (soldiers of the native cavalry corps of the French army in North Africa) from Algeria and of the most pro-Arab officers, the institution of a civil regime for the service of the colonists, created an explosive situation.
These words often occur in Fantasia's historical chapters, and they refer to: a) titles and ranks, including dey (Turkish military leader, city administrator; 16), bey (Turkish governor, often an officer; 27; Vaste, 140, 147-48), Janissaires (Turkish infantry soldiers), agha (administrator, local militia leader; 27), pacha (regional leader; 50), spahis (Algerian soldier in the French cavalry; 63), chaouch (orderly, usher; 113), cheikh (chief; 204; Vaste, 149, 288), and caid (administrator; Vaste, 214, 269, 280, 285).
It consisted of two indigenous units: the Spahis, a cavalry unit, and the Tirailleurs Algeriens, a light infantry unit.
In this essay, I write about the way "Moroccan colonial soldiers," which might include Goums, Tirailleurs, and Spahis were represented in a colonial discourse which sought to appropriate them, and how they were excluded from a nationalist discourse which chose to silence them.
On 22 October 1840 silence promises an imminent and archetypal disaster: some women whose warring protectors had left the night before are sleeping in their tents when the French army, under the leadership of Captains Bosquet and Montagnac and reinforced by Douairs and Spahis, arrives and massacres those who face them with insults and takes as prisoners those who wait calmly and silently, their faces covered with mud to block out the Christian gaze.
7) Divided into infantry units known as tirailleurs, cavalry squadrons called spahis, and local auxiliary companies referred to as goums, the North African units in the early 1920s reached the form that they would retain for the remainder of their existence.
Others provide direction for prevention, screening, and care management (Cashion, 2002; Olsen & Zawacki, 2000; Spahis, 2002; Therriault, 2002).
Congratulations are extended to Dale Halsey Lea, Deborah MacDonald, Hillary Lipe, Lori Farmer, Sue Miller-Samuel, Joanna Spahis, Elizabeth Sparks, Kathleen Calzone, Suzanne Mahon, Kay Murphy, Judith Flanagan, Joie Davis, and Susan Caro.