Spanish America


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Spanish America

the parts of America colonized by Spaniards from the 16th century onwards and now chiefly Spanish-speaking: includes all of South America (except Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, and Surinam), Central America (except Belize), Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and a number of small Caribbean islands
References in periodicals archive ?
En conclusion, Nineteenth-Century Spanish America: A Cultural History presenta una introduccion accesible a la par que rigurosa a los procesos historicos y las claves culturales del siglo xix en Latinoamerica.
In chapter eight, Alejandro Vera Aguilera approaches music in Spanish America, a topic broached in earlier chapters.
(5.) In Spanish America, mestizo refers to someone half European-half indigenous American and the term casta, often translated as 'mixed-race', to all other racial mixtures.
And the 2015 reassessment of the Slave Trade Database by Alex Borucki, David Eltis, and David Wheat ("Atlantic History and the Slave Trade to Spanish America," American Historical Review 120:433-61) is another remarkable sign that the field of the Spanish slave trade is transforming the history of the Atlantic world; their inspiring work also suggests that there is still much to be done in that direction.
In the British colonies, much to their chagrin and not for lack of effort, settlers neither systematically coopted the labor of hierarchical Amerindian societies nor found deposits of mineral wealth to rival those of Portuguese or Spanish America. Nevertheless, their slaving operations did eventually expand inland creating demand for overland dispersal.
The Silver Way: China, Spanish America and the Birth of Globalisation, 15651815, by Peter Gordon and Juan Jose Morales, relates how China was a principal player in this narrative.
Simon Bolivar of Venezuela: Spanish America's most celebrated revolutionary.
When seeking national progress, sovereignty and republicanism were deemed vital in Spanish America. Over the course of the nineteenth century, New Granadians -later Colombians- fostered material progress by looking at the United States and the North Atlantic overall.
The European navigator finished by saying that it is most important to link Europe, the Arab world, Russia and Spanish America together - respecting the traditions of every culture and avoiding trying to impose "political models" on countries where they just do not work.
Their shared goal for the emancipation of Spanish America was a political project that took shape in the minds of exiles.
She reveals how options available to pardos and mulattos in one part of Spanish America were closed off to them in others.