Spanish-American

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Spanish-American

1. of or relating to any of the Spanish-speaking countries or peoples of the Americas
2. a native or inhabitant of Spanish America
3. a Spanish-speaking person in the US
References in periodicals archive ?
"The families really look forward to a hot meal, since they are already struggling with their living conditions,'' said Neddy Latimer, executive director of the Spanish American Center.
Readers of this volume will discover that the Spanish American novel is not only alive and well, but that it is in a process of continual renewal and enrichment.
Likewise, several other Spanish American writers used the United States as the location and literary theme of some of their works, especially Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Cuban authors.
The novelty is not the claim that Joyce influenced Spanish American authors, but the frame for this connection, which relies on a clever double maneuver.
The Root Reforms were aimed at correcting deficiencies discovered during the Spanish American War.
Alonso Carrio de Lavandera's El lazarillo de ciegos caminantes has long been considered to be one of the most important texts of Spanish American literature written during the eighteenth century and has been the subject of excellent book-length studies by Mariselle Melendez, Karen Stolley, and Evaristo de Souza Penha, as well as of a host of journal articles and book chapters.
This first English translation of one of the defining imaginative works by ethnographer Lydia Cabrera (1899-1991) sheds new light on the multiple currents that informed Io real maravilloso, or the "marvelous reality" literary tradition in Spanish American letters.
The Routes of Modernity: Spanish American Poetry from the Early Eighteenth to the Mid-Nineteenth Century.
First, Lewis adds a new level of analysis to the study of Spanish American witchcraft, often characterized as the realm of non-Spaniards generally, by delineating the different roles played by Indians, blacks, mulattos, and mestizos and by specifying Indians as the primary suppliers of witchcraft.
In 1898, at age 39, he resigned his post as Assistant Secretary of the Navy to form a cavalry unit to fight in the Spanish American War in Cuba, where he and his fellow soldiers earned renown as the "Rough Riders." After serving as Governor of New York, Roosevelt became Vice President in Republican President William McKinley's second term.
Puerto Rico came under United States' control in 1898 as a result of the Spanish American War.
The last section of this work describes a "Spanish American baroque" paradigm (306) -- a tradition of reading religious images as hieroglyphic and Neoplatonic symbols.