Spanish Mission Revival

Mission Revival, Mission style

An architectural style popular in the southwestern United States and in Florida from about 1890 to 1930 and beyond; suggestive or imitative of the earlier Mission architecture, although usually much simpler because of the absence of sculptured ornamentation; compare with Spanish Colonial Revival. Buildings in this style are usually characterized by: stucco-finished exterior walls, occasionally with terracotta ornamentation; balconies or balconets; semicircular arches; a roof supported by massive piers with broad arches between them, forming arcaded walkways; multicurved gables; a low-pitched red mission-tile roof; often a hipped roof; open eaves having exposed rafters and a significant overhang; roof ridges topped with a red-tiled protective cap; commonly, dormers; tile-faced bell towers; roof drainage provided by waterspouts that pierce the parapets; typically, double-hung rectangular windows; a main entry door often located within a recessed porch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Designer Robert Frist's goal was to transform the interior of this austere Spanish Mission Revival Home into a warm, inviting environment.
Its architecture is Spanish Mission Revival - all the rage with builders in the 1920s, even here - but with some art deco flourishes thrown in.