spark

(redirected from Sparkish)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

spark,

in electricity: see arcarc,
in electricity, highly luminous and intensely hot discharge of electricity between two electrodes. The arc was discovered early in the 19th cent. by the English scientist Sir Humphry Davy, who so named it because of its shape.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

spark

[spärk]
(electricity)
A short-duration electric discharge due to a sudden breakdown of air or some other dielectric material separating two terminals, accompanied by a momentary flash of light. Also known as electric spark; spark discharge; sparkover.

spark

1. 
a. a momentary flash of light accompanied by a sharp crackling noise, produced by a sudden electrical discharge through the air or some other insulating medium between two points
b. the electrical discharge itself
c. (as modifier): a spark gap
2. a small piece of diamond, as used in the cutting of glass

Spark

Dame Muriel (Sarah). born 1918, British novelist and writer; her novels include Memento Mori (1959), The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961), The Takeover (1976), A Far Cry from Kensington (1988), Symposium (1990), and The Finishing School (2004)

SPARK

(language)
An annotated subset of Ada supported by tools supplied by Praxis Critical Systems (originally by PVL).

http://sparkada.com.

Spark

An open source big data framework from the Apache Software Foundation. Spark is used to analyze huge amounts of real-time data in RAM in contrast to Hadoop (another Apache project), which continuously writes to the storage drive. As a result, Spark is generally many times faster. Because Spark does not have its own distributed file system, it is often used in conjunction with the Hadoop Distributed File System. See Hadoop and big data.
References in periodicals archive ?
(48) He loves her without jealousy because he trusts to her virtue, in the same way she believed that Sparkish was not jealous because "love proceeds from esteem; he cannot distrust [her] virtue" (279).
(57) Even within the play, Sparkish draws attention to the nature of this new relationship between the audience and the performance by defining it as a kind of magic:
Sparkish: Damn the Poets, they turn'd 'em [Sparkish's songs] into Burlesque, as they call it; that Burlesque is a Hocus-Pocus-trick, they have got, which by the virtue of Hictius doctius, topsey turvey, they make a wise and witty Man in the World, a Fool upon the Stage you know not how; and 'tis therefore I hate'em too, for I know not but it may be my own case; for they'l put a Man into a Play for looking a Squint: Their Predecessors were contented to make Serving-men only their Stage-Fools, but these Rogues must have Gentlemen, with a Pox to'em, nay Knights: and indeed you shall hardly see a Fool upon the Stage, but he's a Knight; and to tell you the truth, they have kept me these six years from being a Knight in earnest, for fear of being knighted in a Play, and dubb'd a Fool.
Sparkish: A Pox, Painters don't draw the Small Pox, or Pimples in ones face.
Their own wit deceives them as it does Sparkish, Pinchwife, and ultimately Horner.
(37) For example, Gerald Weales calls her "stupid" or "corrupt" for supporting Margery's statement of innocence in act 5 and blames her for staying true to Sparkish even after the "dullest person in the audience has recognized him for the fool he is" (introduction to The Complete Plays of William Wycherley, xix); Deborah C.