quadriplegia

(redirected from Spastic quadriplegia)
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quadriplegia:

see paraplegiaparaplegia
, paralysis of the lower part of the body, commonly affecting both legs and often internal organs below the waist. When both legs and arms are affected, the condition is called quadriplegia.
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quadriplegia

[‚kwä·drə′plē·jə]
(medicine)
Paralysis affecting the four extremities of the body; may be spastic or flaccid.

quadriplegia

Pathol paralysis of all four limbs, usually as the result of injury to the spine
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is not surprising that spastic quadriplegia caused severe GMD; whole-body involvement usually results from extensive brain damage such as a diffuse CNS infection and severe birth asphyxia, resulting in severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.
Students of the Rashid Pediatric Therapy Centre, the boys have been attending the school for physiological and occupational therapies that treat their rare condition of spastic quadriplegia.
Monika Samaan, 11, was seeking more than 10 million dollars in damages after the illness developed into acquired spastic quadriplegia and acquired profound intellectual disability and liver dysfunction.
The child with spastic diplegia will have different long-term mobility goals than will the child with spastic quadriplegia.
Six had athetoid quadriplegia, six had spastic quadriplegia, and two had spastic diplegia.
Aged just seven months, she caught bronchiolitis and was starved of oxygen for 23 minutes, leaving her with the most severe form of cerebral palsy - spastic quadriplegia.
This infection resulted in mental retardation, spastic quadriplegia, limited vision, painful scoliosis, and chronic seizure disorder.
Many of these children will manifest a rapidly progressive neurological deterioration, resulting in spastic quadriplegia (Gay, et al.
George has cerebral palsy and spastic quadriplegia.
But, James Badenoch QC told Mr Justice Gray at the High Court in London, neurological problems gradually appeared and Bobby was found to suffer from spastic quadriplegia - a very severe form of cerebral palsy.
Inclusion criteria were: (a) medical diagnosis of CP, spastic quadriplegia, or diplegia; (b) no other medical complications, such as seizures or hydrocephalus; (c) normal intelligence as documented by a psychologist; (d) normal spine and hip roentgenograms; (e) passive hip abduction to at least 20 degrees bilaterally as measured in the supine position; (f) passive hamstring muscle mobility to at least 60 degrees of hip flexion by a straight leg test; and (g) functional ability to sit and stand alone or with minimal support.