Sublation

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Related to Speculative philosophy: analytic philosophy, Critical philosophy

Sublation

 

(in German, Aufheben), a fundamental category in the philosophy of G. Hegel. Hegel asserted that sublation has “a dual sense; it means to keep, to preserve, and at the same time to discontinue, to cease” (Soch., vol. 5, Moscow, 1937, p. 99). According to dialectical materialism, sublation includes the moment of negation but comprises more: it also affirms the interrelationships and unity of things and phenomena.

References in periodicals archive ?
Broad, 'Critical and Speculative Philosophy', Contemporary British Philosophy: Personal Statements (First Series), ed.
Speculative philosophy of history, the focus of this paper, can be considered the heart of philosophy of history.
In other words, systematic philosophy or what David Hall calls "the systematic phase of speculative philosophy" serves two crucial purposes.
(9) Such a complete philosophical system, Hegel maintained, is only possible when speculative philosophy makes the synthetic acts effecting the construction of nature as transparent to the intellect as those of its own activity, the project of Schelling's Naturphilosophie.
After discussing Hegel and Kant, Kirkman concludes that speculative philosophy is a poor guide for environmental thinking about nature.
Such modesty is exemplified in the speculative philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead.
Furthermore, the rebirth of speculative philosophy in Florence took place during the 1450s, a time when Cosimo could not possibly have organized the isolation of Florentine intellectuals outside the city because he was in the midst of a political crisis caused by the temporary fragmentation and collapse of his party .
The principle of the art of folly is "the inversion of the ordinary" and this "inversion" should form the basis of speculative philosophy (91).
This is probably due to the fact that not only his language but also his thinking is rooted very much in German intellectual traditions (Romanticism, speculative philosophy, Hegelian Marxism and Jewish Messianism) that appear alien to Anglo-Saxon thought and language.
Rapp hopes to contribute to the rehabilitation of speculative philosophy and thus to the reorientation rather than the rejection of postmodernism.
whether for natural science, as in his second period or for speculative philosophy, as in his third period The first conceptual framework is the standard one which takes, as primitive, spatial points m a three dimensional space, instants of time and particles of matter, in with mass, velocity and direction The latter framework, which he calls Leibnizian takes particles as paths through spacetime and defines the other required concepts in terms of them This is a precursor of his latter treatment of enduring objects as sequences of events, life histories so to speak, exemplifying the same pattern throughout the sequence.