delayed speech

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delayed speech

[di′lād ′spēch]
(medicine)
A speech disorder characterized by a complete absence of vocalization or vocalization with no communicative value; speech is considered delayed when it fails to develop by the second year, caused by impaired hearing, severe childhood illness, or emotional disturbance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The genetic counselor explained that girls with Trisomy X often have speech delays in early childhood, may be slower to walk and develop motor skills, and frequently have learning disabilities.
20) The 12 children who were under 8 years of age, and who had a history of academic difficulties along with speech delay were considered to be at risk for specific learning disability.
Speech delay is known as a relatively late start of speech which has a typical pattern of development.
Association of Chiari I malformation, mental retardation, speech delay and epilepsy: a specific disorder.
The children with mental retardation, speech delay, articulation disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder, autism, SI dysfunction, and nonspecific psychomotor retardation were seen by child psychiatrist.
sup][1] It is known that chromosome Xp duplication syndrome contributes to mental retardation and speech delay.
But before he panics too much, he should remember that it might be something that's easily fixable, like a hearing problem that's causing the speech delay which then leads to the frustration and behavioural problems.
The second part of the questionnaire was 'Language Development Survey-LDS' for the children from 18 to 35 months of age serving as a screening tool for detection and identification of speech delay in children.
Many children require speech therapy because of a speech delay or an issue with articulating.
We can carry out interventions or refer families to groups and other professionals for advice and to provide early intervention for issues such as speech delay in the child, or postnatal depression.
The child has mild cerebral palsy, with right hemiparesis, speech delay, and additional neurologic injuries.