Spenserian Stanza


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Spenserian Stanza

 

a nine-line stanza with the rhyme scheme ababbcbcc; the first eight lines are in iambic pentameter and the last in iambic hexameter. First used by E. Spenser as an epic version of the French lyric stanza ababbcbc in the narrative poem The Faerie Queene (1590–96), it was later revived by Byron in Childe Harold and by Shelley and Keats. The stanza was later used in German and Russian poetry, mainly in translations and stylizations, as in M. Kuzmin’s “The Horseman.” The Spenserian stanza influenced the structure of M. Iu. Lermontov’s 11-line stanza, used in Sashka and “In Memory of A. Odoevskii.”

References in periodicals archive ?
To illustrate the narrative affordances of the Spenserian stanza, I have isolated a sequence of six stanzas from Book 3, canto 1 (stanzas 14-19; see Appendix 1) that constitute a compact narrative episode comprising several tightly integrated events.
For the use of the Spenserian stanza as a series-marker, see the front-matter in my database (which includes full texts of the poems discussed in this essay), "English Poetry 1579-1830: Spenser and the Tradition" (2006).
The Spenserian stanza is flexible enough to sustain the various moods and strategies of an imaginatively told, highly ornamented narration.
This example of Byron's Spenserian stanza is typical in his suppression of the middle couplet and in his climactic use of the final hexameter.
Instead it is a poetic salvo fired above the heads of his enemies, an opening shot in his reengagement in Chartist politics, using the rhymes and rhythms of the Spenserian stanza to enhance his political argument.
There are also numerous traditional stanza forms of a set length and rhyme scheme that have names, as: the ballad stanza, rhyme royal, ottava rima, the Spenserian stanza, terza, rima, etc.
Both the Spenserian stanza and the archaic language contribute to the mythic romance of The Faerie Queene, enveloping the scenes of chivalry and adventure with a singularly appropriate mistiness of style.
A second edition "with divers other poems" (1648) included his version of the fourth book of Virgil's Aeneid, in Spenserian stanza.
Invented by Edmund Spenser for his poem The Faerie Queene (1590-1609), the Spenserian stanza was a revolutionary innovation in its day.
the Spenserian stanza or the In Memoriam stanza, popularized by Alfred, Lord Tennyson in the poem by that title.
The Spenserian stanzas follow a protagonist's journey through Europe as it reeled from the cruel toll of revolutionary and Napoleonic wars.
Wet night turf spread below the window like thick untranslated Spenserian stanzas describing fairy glens.