Speusippus


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Speusippus

(spyo͞osĭp`əs), fl. 347–339 B.C., Greek philosopher; disciple and nephew of Plato, whom he succeeded as head of the AcademyAcademy,
school founded by Plato near Athens c.387 B.C. It took its name from the garden (named for the hero Academus) in which it was located. Plato's followers met there for nine centuries until, along with other pagan schools, it was closed by Emperor Justinian in A.D. 529.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Speusippus distinguished 10 grades of being, thereby prefiguring Neoplatonism. He held that the good is not the source of being but is its goal. One of his most significant ideas is that it is impossible to have satisfactory knowledge of anything without knowing all things besides. A portion of his writings on Pythagorean numbers has survived.
References in periodicals archive ?
This period saw me publication of his translations of two Platonic works, Alcinous on Plato's Doctrine and the Platonic Definitions of Speusippus. Ten of the dialogues were also ready before Cosimo died as well as Ficino's major commentaries on Plato's Philebus (published 1464), on ethics and the highest Good, and on the Symposium (published 1469).
Rather than remain in the Academy after Plato's death when the headship passed to Plato's nephew, Speusippus, Aristotle left Athens for Assos and there founded his own school.
46-7 asserts that Philolaus mentioned prime numbers The reference to Philolaus is in Speusippus ap.
At XIV.4.13-14 Eusebius summarizes the first line of successors, Speusippus, Xenocrates, and Polemon, and their place in the development of the Academy.
Of the eleven chapters in his book, one is introductory, two discuss hermeneutical and methodological issues that concern the reading of Plato, one is on Aristotle, and the final seven are on the Platonic tradition from Speusippus to Plotinus.
(55) The intriguing point is that Iamblichus ascribes this definition to Speusippus (Taran F54a-b; Lang fr.
Via Speusippus's idea of the One prior to being and goodness, Aristotle was aware of the position that the First Principle must be beyond intellect.
of Bern) argues that in Parmenides Plato is showing Speusippus, his nephew and would-be successor as head of the Academy, how his conception of unity is bound to fail.
(50) We find the following accounts of an epideictic speech being read: the Lysianic Eroticus in the Phaedrus; the funeral speech of `Aspasia' in the Menexenus; the Philippus of Isocrates in the Letter of Speusippus (Epist.
Plato dies in 347, Speusippus becomes his successor.
7 We do not find any clues as to the views of Plato's immediate successors, Speusippus and Xenocrates, on the correct indulgence in, or use of, love, but a straw in the wind, I think, is provided by a rather obscure dictum of Polemon, last head of the Old Academy, reported by Plutarch (in his essay To an Uneducated Ruler 780d), to the effect that 'Love is the service of the gods for the care and preservation of the young' [Greek Text Omitted].
Philosophies that would fit here are Stoicism, which identifies God both with the active, rational element of the universe, and with one of its material components, (44) and evolutionary models (such as Aristotle attributes to Speusippus) in which the simple first is actualized by expressing itself in the production of diversity, just as a grown plant actualizes the potency of a seed.