Sphingidae

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Related to Sphinx moths: hummingbird moth, Hawk Moths

Sphingidae

[′sfin·jə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The single family of the lepidopteran superfamily Sphingoidea.

Sphingidae

 

a family of hawk moths. They are of average and large size; the wingspan is 2 to 18 cm. They are characterized by a cigar-shaped body, narrow elongated forewings, and spindle-shaped antennae. The insects can fly with a velocity of up to 54 km/hr and “stand” in the air, sucking nectar from flowers with their long tongue while in flight. (The length of the tongue in the Madagascar hawk moth, Macrosila predicta, exceeds 25 cm.) Sphingidae caterpillars are always naked. They feed on leaves, stripping the shoots bare. There are about 1,200 species, which are found throughout the world. Most are found in the tropics; in the European part of the USSR there are 26 species, and about 40 are found in the Far East. Some members of the family Sphingidae are capable of long flights. (Daphnis nerii flies from the shores of the Black Sea to Finland.) The pupae winter in the soil. Some species are harmful to one or several closely related plants, most frequently woody plants. The pine hawk moth (Sphinx pinastri) and the eyed hawk moth (Smerinthus ocellatus) are among the harmful species in the USSR. The convolvulus hawk moth (Herse convolvuli) is useful in destroying bindweed in the southern Ukraine.

REFERENCES

Kuznetsov, N. Ia. “Obzor semeistva Sphingidae palearkticheskoi i otchasti paleanarkticheskoi (kitaisko-gimalaiskoi) fauny.” Tr. Russkogo entomologicheskogo obshchestva, 1906, vol. 37, nos. 3–4.
Zhizn’ zhivotnykh. Edited by L. A. Zenkevich, vol. 3. Moscow, 1969.
Seitz, A. Die Gross-Schmetterlinge der Erde, section 1, vol. 2. Stuttgart, 1913.

V. I. KUZNETSOV

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, when the sphinx moth slips its long tongue into a cereus cactus flower, grains of pollen stick to the moth's tongue.
Say a sphinx moth catches a whiff of cactus flowers.
Sphinx moths, also called hummingbird moths, are fun to watch as they feed on flower nectar in the evenings, but the eggs they lay hatch into the infamous tomato and tobacco hornworms, which damage garden crops.
Manduca quinquemaculata (Family Sphingidae) like most sphinx moth larvae has a dorsal horn at the tip of its abdomen.