Pompilidae

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Pompilidae

[pam′pil·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The spider wasps, the single family of the superfamily Pompiloidea.

Pompilidae

 

(synonym, Psammocharidae), the spider wasps, a family of aculeate hymenopterous insects of the superfamily Vespoidea. Generally the insects are of large or medium size. There are more than 3,000 species distributed throughout the world, especially in the tropics. About 150 species are found in the USSR, the greatest diversity occurring in the Transcaucasus and Middle Asia. Most pompilids dig burrows in the ground, where they lay their eggs on spiders that have been paralyzed by stings and that serve as food for the larvae. Some species use prey provisioned by other pompilids.

References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists combined data from the transcriptome -- showing which genes are active and being transcribed from DNA into RNA -- and genomic (DNA) data from a number of species of ants, bees and wasps, including bradynobaenid wasps, a cuckoo wasp, a spider wasp, a scoliid wasp, a mud dauber wasp, a tiphiid wasp, a paper wasp and a pollen wasp; a velvet ant (wasp); a dracula ant; and a sweat bee, Lasioglossum albipes.
That's closely followed by the tarantula hawk - actually a spider wasp - that grows to 5cm long and can be found in most parts of the world apart from, luckily, Europe.
The biology of the spider wasp, Pepsis thisbe (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae) from Trans Pecos, Texas.
This study analyzed the ability of females of the spider wasp, Pepsis formosa to detect and respond to olfactory cues (treatment odors) associated with two species of theraphosid spider hosts (Aphonopelma harlingenum and A.
Neurochemical events associated with learning and hunting in the spider wasp, Pepsis formosa (Hymenopptera: Pompilidae).
Simultaneously, we investigated whether the local distribution of its main parasitoid, the spider wasp Arachnospila rufa (Hymenoptera, Pompilidae) was associated with its host.
Assuming that our findings are not due to sampling artifacts, parasitoid absence in small populations indicates low dispersal abilities or at least low dispersal motivation in spider wasp within spatially structured suitable habitat surrounded by hostile matrix vegetation.
This positive relationship between provision mass and offspring size has been reported for a wide range of mass provisioners, for example, the spider wasp, Pepsis thisbe Lucas (Punzo 1994), the red mason bee, Osmia rufa L.
Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of encounter experience with a host on the hunting behavior of naive females of the spider wasp, Pepsis cerberus (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae).
The hemolymph composition and neurochemistry of the spider wasp, Pepsis formosa (Say) (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae).
Conversely, mites (Acarina), millipedes (Diplopoda), centipedes (Chilopoda), solifuges (Solifugae), earwigs (Dermaptera), velvet ants (Mutillidae) and spider wasps (Pompilidae) occurred least frequently.
2000), spider wasps are typically diurnal in xeric habitats (Punzo 1995), desert mites and mutillids can be scarce in certain years (Punzo 2000a), and solifuges are not only aggressive but exhibit the most rapid running speeds among the arachnids and typically flee when they encounter aggressive opponents (Punzo 1998).