Spiny Dogfish


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Spiny Dogfish

 

(Acanthias acanthias), a fish of the suborder Selachoidei. Body length, up to 2 m; weight, up to 15 kg. The spiny dogfish is distributed in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. In the USSR it is found in the Barents and Black seas, as well as in the seas of the Far East. The fish has commercial value.

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Numerous studies have been conducted on the reproduction of the spiny dogfish worldwide (Kaganovskaia, 1937; Yamamoto and Kibezaki, 1950; Jensen, 1965; Ketchen, 1972; Hanchet, 1988; Avsar, 2001; Chatzispyrou and Megalofonou, 2005; Di Giacomo et al., 2009; Capape and Reynaud, 2011; Gracan et al., 2013).
The spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) is a small demersal shark of temperate continental shelf areas worldwide.
Forays by Spiny Dogfish into shallower waters are likely limited to nighttime (NOAA 1990), suggesting that they may not use Eelgrass habitat during the day or may use Eelgrass habitat differently between day and night.
Ctenophora were readily identifiable in the stomachs of spiny dogfish, at sea upon macroscopic inspection, by their obvious firm-gelatin constitution, small and clear ball-like shape, uniquely (relative to any other spiny dogfish prey) colored pinkish-gray masses, and particularly the ctene rows.
On behalf of the 27 EU member states, Germany is proposing to list the spiny dogfish and a second seriously depleted shark species, the porbeagle, in Appendix II of CITES.
Alignment of three sea squirt DM proteins with known sequences for human, chick, frog, zebrafish, spiny dogfish, and fruit fly.
North Atlantic waters show a pattern of overfishing, and ever-shrewd nature has filled these niches with such "trash fish" as skates and spiny dogfish that we cannot eat and thus do not take out.
France and Britain are interested only in spiny dogfish, and Italy is extremely strict on quality control.
"The spiny dogfish (squalus acanthias) is among the slowest-growing, latest maturing and longest lived of shark species.
Abstract--Commercial fishermen have argued that localized concentrations of spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) in the northeast U.S.
One of the earliest works on fishes in North America is Smith's "Natural History of the Fishes of Massachusetts" (1833) which included eight species of sharks (and four rays), most of which can clearly be identified: Smooth Dogfish, Mustelus canis\ Spiny Dogfish, Squalus acanthi as', White Shark, Carcharodon carcharias; Blue Shark, Prionace glauca; Common Thresher, Alopias vulpinus; Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna sp.; and Basking Shark, Cetorhinus maximus.