spire

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spire,

high, tapering structure crowning a tower and having a general pyramidal outline. The simplest spires were the steeply pitched timber roofs capping Romanesque towers and campaniles. In later Romanesque architecture the spire was commonly octagonal, topping a square tower. Transition between the two shapes was effected by filling each corner with a decorative pinnacle or a small turret. With Gothic development the spire became more elaborate. Generally the tower proper was capped by a parapet, behind which rose the stone spire, its edges finished with a molding and adorned with crockets. The corner pinnacles, with their niches, gables, and crockets, were often joined to the spire roof by flying arches. In France spires (called flèches) sometimes were placed over the two western towers of the cathedrals; at Chartres they are of two different periods, Romanesque and Gothic. In England the central tower of a cathedral often had a spire; at Lichfield one crowns each western tower as well. The ultimate elaboration in Gothic spires was attained with the addition of openwork tracery, as in the flamboyant example of Rouen (Tour de Beurre). The Germans, particularly, favored intricate openwork compositions, as at the cathedrals of Strasbourg (1015–1439) and Vienna (15th cent.). England in the late 17th cent. gave the spire new form in the numerous churches that Sir Christopher Wren built for London after the great fire. These were either the roof type, with richly curved baroque outlines, or cupola compositions with such classical features as columns and pediments. St. Martin-in-the-Fields (1722–26), built by James Gibbs, illustrates the Georgian spire or steeple with its receding stages of classic architecture terminated by a steep pyramidal roof. It was an influential prototype for the slender, classical spires of American colonial churches.

Spire

A slender pointed element on top of a building, generally a narrow octagonal pyramid set above a square tower.

Spire

 

a vertical, sharply pointed structure surmounting a building, having the shape of a cone tapering upward. Spires are often capped with a flag or a sculpted or carved figure, such as the ship on the Admiralty spire in Leningrad.

spire

[spīr]
(architecture)
As a landmark, a prominent, slender, pointed structure surmounting a building; a spire is seldom less than two-thirds of the entire height, and its lines are rarely broken by stages or other features.
(botany)
A narrow, tapering blade or stalk.

spire

Any slender pointed construction surmounting a building; generally a narrow octagonal pyramid set above a square tower.

spire

1
1. a tall structure that tapers upwards to a point, esp one on a tower or roof or one that forms the upper part of a steeple
2. a slender tapering shoot or stem, such as a blade of grass

spire

2
the apical part of a spiral shell
References in periodicals archive ?
James Klemaszewski of the Academic Research Lab in Phoenix and his colleagues theorize that as some of the ice in the spires vaporizes, it leaves behind the dark dust.
To this day there stands in Cathedral Square a bust of the locksmith, his eyes fixed on the spire he rescued--`the great pink angel of Strasbourg' as Claudel described it.
This same spire became a symbol of hope amid the trauma of World War II for many who were driven from their native Alsace.
Mark Little, CEO of Spire Biomedical, stated, "We have increased our processing capacity due to the increased quantity of components we have been receiving from our customers, which has been growing steadily over the past year.
That company has used Spire equipment for many years," said Roger Little, Spire Corporation's President and CEO.
Spire Solar Chicago provides large grid connected systems for public, residential and commercial buildings in the Chicago area including a PV array to convert an environmental brownfield into a solar brightfield.
Henry Kurth, manager of the Energy Division of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs, the largest source of funding for the PV systems, stated, "DCCA is proud to be an active partner with ComEd, the City of Chicago, the Clean Energy Community Foundation and Spire Solar Chicago in developing innovative renewable resource projects.
Claretian Associates jumped at the opportunity to partner with Spire Solar Chicago, Commonwealth Edison, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs and the Chicago Departments of Environment and Housing to make this innovation a reality for moderate income, first-time homebuyers in the City of Chicago.
Spire Corporation provides solar electric systems for distributed power generation and is a leading supplier of solar electric module manufacturing equipment, turnkey production lines, and solar energy businesses.
The importance of our activities in the German solar electric market is evidenced by the fact that Spire shares have recently begun trading on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, allowing European investors to follow our growth more closely.
In addition, the City of Chicago has announced that it intends to have Spire Solar Chicago, in cooperation with ComEd, deploy a 500 kW solar electric system on a brownfield on Chicago's South Side thereby converting it into a Solar Brightfield(TM).