Spirochetosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Spirochetosis: intestinal spirochetosis

Spirochetosis

 

in man and animals, one of a group of diseases caused by pathogenic spirochetes. Spirochetoses differ in their epidemiology and clinical manifestations. Distinctions are made, according to the mechanism of infection, between intestinal, respiratory, blood, and skin spirochetoses. Leptospiroses are among the most common forms of intestinal spirochetoses. Respiratory spirochetoses occur mainly in tropical countries. Blood spirochetoses include different forms of relapsing fever caused by lice and ticks—forms characterized by natural endemism. Skin spirochetoses include yaws, syphilis, and pinta. Spirochetoses also include sodoku and diseases caused by an association of spirochetes and bacteria, for example, Simanovskii-Vincent’s angina and ulcerative stomatitis.

REFERENCES

Rukovodstvo po tropicheskim bolezniam, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1974.
In birds. Avian spirochetosis is an infectious disease of poultry and wild birds caused by the spirochete Spirochaeta anserinum. The disease is manifested by fever, listlessness, and paresis of the motor organs. The mortality rate is 80 percent. The source of the causative agent is sick birds, and ticks subsequently transmit the infection. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, epizootiologi-cal data, and the bacteriological examination of blood smears. Osarsol and antibiotics are used to treat the disease. Preventive measures include the vaccination of birds and the control of ticks.
Spirochetosis is also found in rabbits.

REFERENCES

Artemichev, M. A. “Spirokhetoz.” In Bolezniptits. Moscow, 1962.
Reshetniak, V. Z. Spirokhetoz ptits. Moscow, 1971.
References in periodicals archive ?
Few reports in the literature (amounting to less than 30 patients) have described patients with intestinal spirochetosis who presented with a clinical and histological picture of acute appendicitis (8,9).
No consensus guidelines for the treatment of intestinal spirochetosis exists as only successful case reports of trial antibiotic regimens have been described.
Improvement of chronic diarrhea after treatment for intestinal spirochetosis.
Intestinal spirochetosis as a cause of chronic diarrhea in patients with HIV infection: case report and review of literature.
Spirochetosis can be a difficult histologic diagnosis that can be confused with a prominent brush border or totally overlooked.
Focality of infection could explain our failure to detect a number of infections, especially CMV, but also perhaps spirochetosis and cryptosporidiosis.
In this study, 5 of 12 cases of adenovirus colitis had coinfections: 2 with CMV alone and 1 each with CMV plus Mycobacterium avium complex, CMV plus enteropathogenic bacterial infection, and CMV plus spirochetosis.
Isolation of Serpulina pilosicoli from rectal biopsy specimens showing evidence of intestinal spirochetosis.
Spirochetosis of the human rectum associated with an intraepithelial mast cell and plasma cell response.
Comparative pathology and pathogenesis of naturally acquired and experimentally induced colonic spirochetosis.
Pathogenicity of human and porcine intestinal spirochetes in one-day-old specific-pathogen-free chicks: an animal model of intestinal spirochetosis.
Intestinal spirochetosis and chronic watery diarrhea: clinical and histological response to treatment and long-term follow up.