Spirodela


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Spirodela

 

a genus of aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae. It has a single species—great duckweed (Spirodella polyrrhiza) —a perennial plant with a rounded modified stem, or frond, which floats on the surface of the water and bears a bundle of small roots. The unisexual flowers do not have a perianth and are gathered into an inflorescence containing one pistillate and one staminate flower. The fruit is monospermous and indehis-cent. Great duckweed rarely blossoms. It propagates by branching of the frond. The plant grows in the northern hemisphere; it is found throughout the USSR except in the Crimea and Middle Asia, growing in stagnant and slow-moving waters. Great duckweed serves as feed for pigs, geese, ducks, and fowl.

References in periodicals archive ?
Enantiospecific hydrolysis of acetates of racemic monoterpenic alcohols by Spirodela oligorrhiza.
This might be the reason why some submerged plants such as Utricularia vulgaris, Spirodela polyrhiza, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, and Elodea canadensis present in the modern vegetation of L.
Decomposition is intensive for macrophytes with soft tissues such as Utricularia vulgaris, Spirodela polyrhiza, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, and Elodea canadensis; so they are unlikely to be preserved as fossils.
trisulca, Spirodela polyrrhiza, Ceratophylum demersum, Elodea
of a waste water pond in Aligarh showing blooms of Spirodela polyrrhiza
However, inhibition of growth in Spirodela polyrrhiza
counts of Spirodela polyrrhiza was observed as a result of chromium
Salvinia natans and Spirodela polyrrhiza, respectively (Sen et al.
between heavy metal accumulation and toxicity in Spirodela polyrrhiza L.
Habitat: Quiet ponds and lakes, usually in soft, acid waters (Voss 1972); commonly associated with Elodea canadensis, Lemna minor, Myriophyllum exalbescens, Nuphar advena, Nymphaea odorata, Polygonom amphibium, Pontedaria cordata, Potamogeton pectinatus, Spirodela polyrhiza, and Utricularia vulgaris (Swink & Wilhelm 1994).
Nutrient deficiency-dependent anthocyanin development in Spirodela polyrhiza L.