Spitzer Space Telescope


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Spitzer Space Telescope:

see infrared astronomyinfrared astronomy,
study of celestial objects by means of the infrared radiation they emit, in the wavelength range from about 1 micrometer to about 1 millimeter. All objects, from trees and buildings on the earth to distant galaxies, emit infrared (IR) radiation.
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; observatory, orbitingobservatory, orbiting,
research satellite designed to study solar radiation, electromagnetic radiation from distant stars, the earth's atmosphere, or the like. Because the atmosphere and other aspects of the earth's environment interfere with astronomical observations from the
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.

Spitzer Space Telescope

An infrared astronomy space observatory launched Aug. 2003. It was the fourth and last of NASA's Great Observatories and was also a significant scientific and technical element in the agency's long-term Origins Program. Lifted into space from Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA, by a Boeing Delta rocket, Spitzer was placed in an orbit around the Sun, following in the Earth's wake. Initially it was dubbed the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) but was renamed after launch to commemorate the US astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, Jr, the first astronomer to propose placing a large telescope in space and one of the leading scientists involved in the development of the Hubble Space Telescope. The 950-kg Spitzer spacecraft consists of a reflecting telescope with a beryllium mirror measuring 8.5 millimeters in diameter (focal ratio f/12), in the focal plane of which lie three cryogenically cooled science instruments incorporating technically advanced, large-format infrared detector arrays. Spitzer is designed to carry out imaging and photometry over the wavelength range of 3–180 micrometers (μm), spectroscopy over 5–40 μm, and spectrometry over 50–100 μm. The telescope and detectors are surrounded by liquid helium, which maintains them at their operating temperature of less than 5.5 K. NASA astronomers hope to operate the Spitzer Space Telescope for five years or more, using it to identify and investigate dusty disks around nearby stars that may be planet nurseries, to peer into clouds of dust and gas that may be the cradles of newborn stars, and to gaze beyond the Milky Way at very luminous infrared galaxies powered by gigantic black holes.
References in periodicals archive ?
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.
The US space agency's Spitzer space telescope surveyed six groups of neighbouring stars with masses similar to that of the Sun.
The new version includes featured observatories with images from NASA observatory satellites, including x-ray images from NASA's Chandra satellite; infrared images by the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS); a microwave map of the sky by the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe (WMAP); and ultraviolet images by the GALEX Satellite.
The observations come from the Spitzer Space Telescope, which recently focused on a huge, eye-shaped cloud of gas and dust called the Helix nebula, 700 light-years from Earth.
The new Sombrero picture combines a recent infrared observation from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope with a well- known visible light image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
The infrared Spitzer space telescope identified the planet which is thought to be a million years old,meaning it is a mere baby.
A large international team of researchers found the planet when looking at data acquired by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope in June-July 2016, when the telescope was looking at a recently discovered microlensing event called OGLE-2016-BLG-1190.
But Spitzer Space Telescope images reveal a faint infrared glow--there's still something there.
LOS ANGELES (CyHAN)- Planets having atmospheres rich in helium may be common in our Milky Way galaxy, according to a new theory based on data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
The star-studded panorama of our galaxy is constructed from more than 2 million infrared snapshots taken over the past 10 years by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
Researchers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to study developing stars have had a hard time figuring out why the stars give off more infrared light than expected.
Now, a different team of scientists spying on the presumed planet, dubbed Fomalhaut b, with the Spitzer Space Telescope suggests that the dot in the original image isn't a planet at all.