Sponge Bath


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Sponge Bath

 

a preventive treatment during which the individual parts of the body are rapidly rubbed with either a coarse cloth or a rubber sponge moistened in water whose temperature, at first 32°–30°C, is gradually lowered to 20°–18°C. Sponge baths cause the body to feel warm, refreshed, alert, and infused with strength. They are used to strengthen the body and increase its resistance to colds. They are also prescribed for overfatigue and neurasthenia, between rheumatic attacks, and when the body is weakened after disease.

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Get a distiller and take a gallon of the distilled water, warm it, and pour it into a sink or basin--then take a sponge bath.
A good old-fashioned sponge bath works wonders, and is very refreshing.
James Ayotte said patrons called police after they found a man they didn't recognize taking a sponge bath in the men's room at the Joseph P.
Ill get some water to give him a sponge bath," I offered.
Tell them to have a sponge bath if the heat really gets them down.
SPONGE BATH 39224320-7 12 pieces 13328 3332 2221 1111
In a TV documentary shot in London, I watched a very old man, bedridden and weak, being given a sponge bath by a Filipino caregiver.
Surely the level of sexiness in sponge bath candidates must have dropped since Sid James passed away.
Sometimes I shower every other day and take a sponge bath in between.
* Give lukewarm baths or "sponge baths" twice daily.
These less frequent baths appear to decrease the risk of temperature variability, and tub baths are preferable to sponge baths. "In sponge bathing, wet skin is more exposed to ambient air, which is typically colder than body temperature.
Infants, toddlers and people who have illnesses should be sponge bathed to reduce their chances of swallowing water.