Spongillidae

Spongillidae

[spən′jil·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of fresh- and brackish water sponges in the order Haplosclerida which are chiefly gray, brown, or white in color, and encrusting, massive, or branching in form.

Spongillidae

 

a family of freshwater invertebrates of the order Keratosa. Found on underwater objects in the form of irregular or treelike overgrowths 1 m high. Their color is green, yellow, or cinnamon-brown. The skeleton consists of siliceous spicules connected by an organic substance called spongin. The Spongillidae are widespread throughout the world. Sixteen genera are known; of these, four live in the rivers and lakes of the USSR. They reproduce either sexually or by budding. In the temperate zone the sponges die off, forming a large number of so-called winter buds or gemmules—spherical bodies (less than 1 mm in diameter) enclosed in a strong protective membrane. In the spring the gemmules germinate into young sponges. Spongillidae may do harm by settling in water pipes and clogging them. Powder made from dry Spongillidae is a popular remedy rubbed into the skin in the form of ointment for rheumatic and other pains.

REFERENCE

Rezvoi, P. D. “Presnovodnye gubki.” Moscow-Leningrad, 1936. (Fauna SSSR, vol. 2. issue 2.)
References in periodicals archive ?
At least six genera of freshwater sponges inhabit the western gulf slope drainages (Old, 1936; Sublette, 1957; Poirrier, 1972; Davis, 1980a, 1980b; Manconi and Pronzato, 2005), but only Davis (1980a, 1980b) documents occurrence of Class Demospongiae: Spongillidae in streams west of the Gulf Coastal Plain ecoregion of Texas.
Metaniidae, Metschnikowiidae, Paleospongillidae, Potamolepidae, Spongillidae.
Spongillidae is the only identified family of sponges found in North American fresh waters.
Most studied species are associated with Spongillidae or usually collected as free-swimming individuals.