spontaneous symmetry breaking

(redirected from Spontaneously broken symmetry)

spontaneous symmetry breaking

[spän′tā·nē·əs ′sim·ə·trē ‚brāk·iŋ]
(physics)
A situation in which the solution of a set of physical equations fails to exhibit a symmetry possessed by the equations themselves; an example is a magnet, in which the underlying equations describing the metal do not distinguish any direction of space from any other, but the magnet certainly does, since it points in some definite direction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second volume continues with non-abelian gauge theories, quantum chromodynamics and the renormalization group, spontaneously broken symmetry, and weak interactions and the electroweak theory.
Following the expert commentaries, six chapters cover fluctuation and gauge effect on the behavior of superconductors, the exciton enhancement mechanism theory, spontaneously broken symmetry and inhomogeneous superconducting states in ferromagnet/superconductor nanostructures, superconductivity in chemical vapor-deposition diamond thick films, and a model of super conductivity in Fermi liquid.
Yoshihiko Saito and Kunio Yasue present us with a paper, Pedagogic Demonstration of Spontaneously Broken Symmetry by Magnetic Compasses, where they address one of the most important concepts in modern physics-spontaneously broken symmetry (SBS).
One of the most important concepts in modern physics is spontaneously broken symmetry (SBS).